Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 8th May 2012 21:05 UTC, submitted by Francis
Features, Office "The Apache OpenOffice Project today announced the availability of Apache OpenOffice 3.4, the first release of OpenOffice under the governance of the Apache Software Foundation." I don't think OpenOffice could have ended up in a better foster home.
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Perhaps the difference will grow
by jessesmith on Tue 8th May 2012 21:43 UTC
jessesmith
Member since:
2010-03-11

I suspect that while both suites are fairly similar in function now, they will probably slowly grow apart. In a few years I wouldn't be surprised if LibreOffice becomes a fast-moving, mostly Linux-oriented project, while OpenOffice takes a more conservative "for enterprises" approach. Sort of like the difference between Fedora and RHEL, two products with strong similarities, but different focus.

Reply Score: 3

ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

I suspect that while both suites are fairly similar in function now, they will probably slowly grow apart. In a few years I wouldn't be surprised if LibreOffice becomes a fast-moving, mostly Linux-oriented project, while OpenOffice takes a more conservative "for enterprises" approach. Sort of like the difference between Fedora and RHEL, two products with strong similarities, but different focus.


Except that Fedora is a testbed for RHEL, not the other way around.

OpenOffice is now Apache licensed while LibreOffice retained the original OpenOffice LGPL license.

That means that OpenOffice is at a disadvantage because any big, killer features in OpenOffice can be ported to LibreOffice but not vice-versa.

Edited 2012-05-08 23:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

jessesmith Member since:
2010-03-11

That sort of misses my point.
Besides which, LO could still be a test bed for features that eventually could make it into AOO. The actual code may not flow from LO to AOO, but the features, the ideas, could be copied if they were found to be successful. Lots of open source projects copy features without using the same code.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Finalzone Member since:
2005-07-06

Except that Fedora is a testbed for RHEL, not the other way around.


That statement needs to die a trillion death. Fedora is the base for RHEL much like Debian unstable was or still is the base for Ubuntu

Reply Parent Score: 2