Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th May 2012 02:02 UTC
Mac OS X "Dragging and dropping is a great way to get stuff done on your Mac, but DragonDrop makes it even better. DragonDrop lets you set down what you're dragging, leaving you free to find your destination without worrying about keeping the mouse button held down." Great utility (found via Daring Fireball), but shaking with the mouse is a horrible interaction - it's very intensive and error-prone (Aero Shake, anyone?). I'd love for that little drop container to be permanently visible (oh, and a Windows/Linux version would be awesome, of course).
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RE: Comment by Drumhellar
by Kochise on Wed 9th May 2012 09:02 UTC in reply to "Comment by Drumhellar"
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03

Beware not to copy pr0n and leave your session open for everybody to see those pics/urls ;)

BTW, I love those file managers called OS that cannot even offer something as simple as this, sold for 5 $. Because you obviously need a plugin for copy/paste, need a plugin for screenshot, need a replacement for file manager, need a replacement for window manager, need a replacement for browser, need a replacement for text editing, etc...

What have you bought in the first place ? OS X or Win 7 aren't cheap, yet you cannot perform many things with the software, installed as-is...

Kochise

Edited 2012-05-09 09:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Ford Prefect on Wed 9th May 2012 16:38 in reply to "RE: Comment by Drumhellar"
Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

Welcome to GNU/Linux, where all this stuff is included in the OS.

Note: Included does not mean installed by-default. But we all know the difference between installing a package through your OS package manager for free and paying for third-party software on their website.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Kochise on Wed 9th May 2012 19:30 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Well, when I meant lego-style OS, when you have to pay (or not) for bricks in order to get a fully usable OS, especially when it already weights several GB just fresh installed, that's what bother me alot. Linux is not a choice per see, especially if you have to master command line to perform what Windows or OS X can do all graphically. The test is simple : put my father or mother front of a computer, ask them to open the web, fetch paint.net, install it and use it to make a simple picture. Synaptic has made a great progress in the area, yet Gimp ain't the best tool for that (especially if you have to sudo to get the packages and dependencies installed successfully)

Strange that Linux can perform all graphically on embedded computers (Android somebody ?) but not really on the desktop (Unity somebody ?) and these "bricks" can leverage the user experience but providing shortcuts or else to the end user, without having to know something about coding a single bash file.

That's where computers and os falls apart : making things simple yet powerful. My mother, fresh newcomer into the fabulous world of computing, eagerly asked me how to send me her best shots of her vacation. Explain her simply how to select her desired photos, copy them into another (sub)folder, batch redim them to 1024x..., split folders to get 10 MB max folders, ZIP each folder, sent each ZIP in an unique mail, etc...

And for these kind of tasks a pay software could exist just to automate a large load of this task list. Because the OPERATING SYSTEM is unable to do so easily :/

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Welcome to GNU/Linux, where all this stuff is included in the OS.


Really?

Note: Included does not mean installed by-default. But we all know the difference between installing a package through your OS package manager for free and paying for third-party software on their website.


So, not included then. Because, this feature could be free if the author had chosen, included for free in the Mac App store and so, by your definition, "part of the OS". Something is not "included in the OS" unless, you know, it is included in the OS. Otherwise, Mono and Java and [random package] is "included in the OS". And is this RPM, or Debian based Linux? And what about distorts that build from source? And does this include all architectures? PowerPC? Arm? Obscure Chinese MIPS clone?

Reply Parent Score: 2