Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 8th May 2012 17:55 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless This is fun. The number one iOS carrier duking it out with the company behind the world's most popular smartphone operating system. Last month, Google's lead for the Android Open Source Project, Jean-Baptiste Queru, more or less blamed carriers (see comments) for Android's upgrade woes. Yesterday, AT&T's CEO Randall Stephenson retaliated, blaming Google for the delays. And yes, Google already responded to that, too.
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jabbotts
Member since:
2007-09-06

My Nexus got the OS update the day it was available from Google.. how long after that did non-Nexus devices start getting ICS 4.0.4?

But hey, if believing the vendor/carier posturing helps you sleep at night.. don't let facts get in the way

Reply Parent Score: 3

Panajev Member since:
2008-01-09

Sure, I would not expect Google to be able to pull a MS that is able to manage putting enough drivers and other binary blobs ;) on the installation medium of choice to allow almost any user to take that CD/DVD and install it on the vast majority of PC or Notebooks out there and update straight from Windows Update from there on...

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

The hardware manufacturer provides a mini-firmware containing just the hardware drivers specific to the device. Google provides the OS firmware image. Google also provides a flashing utility which has two input fields (browse buttons, automated download.. whatever); one for the firmware and one for the driver bundle. Both blobs are flashed to the applicable places within the device.

Tadaa.. stock Android running across multiple hardware platforms and the manufacturers get to keep there "secret sauce" excuse for only releasing driver binaries.

That's just one approach to the driver support issue; it's really a minor thing easily solved a number of other user friendly ways also.

Reply Parent Score: 2

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

My Nexus got the OS update the day it was available from Google.. how long after that did non-Nexus devices start getting ICS 4.0.4?

But hey, if believing the vendor/carier posturing helps you sleep at night.. don't let facts get in the way.


Oh, I'm not saying that it isn't the carriers' fault - I'm saying I don't give a shit who's fault it is. If Google can only manage to get one brand of phone updated in a timely manner, then that phone is the only Android phone that should be released. There is absolutely no valid excuse as to why customers should have to wait months for new updates, esp when their phones are nearly identical hardware-wise to people who already got the update.

Of course, considering that I had to wait to get the 4.04 update on my Verizon Galaxy Nexus, it appears that Google can't even get that right on their own phone. In this respect, they're still lagging behind Apple.

In regard to the delay issues, it probably wouldn't hurt if Google started releasing beta builds of new versions of Android months in advance like Apple does with iOS, instead of waiting until their latest Nexus phone is released. That would at least give vendors a few months to start testing new builds with current phones.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

WorknMan,

Same here, don't care who's fault it is, just get the sh*t strait and fix it!

Makes me kind of wish there were more devices with just stock OSes on them with no boatware/customizations from carriers to interfere at all. Just take them out of the loop completely, they don't add value.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I tend to believe that understanding which party is responsible for causing the problem leads to being able to better address the problem. Carriers who cause delays will not stop causing delays while everyone is pointing fingers elsewhere but when all the figures accurately point at them, they'll be more motivated to stop causing grief.

I do agree that Google could have done a better job with the license. The result is that we have Android and a bunch of one-off vendor modified fork distributions. With my own carrier, I'll have to watch closer for update release from google and availability through the carrier network.

On the up side, because it is a Nexus, I was able to simply fetch the update from google and flash the device myself. Nothing stopping you from updating yourself when the over-air update lags behind availability. (Google could provide a better firmware flash utility though too)

Reply Parent Score: 2