Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th May 2012 18:16 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Speaking of HP, the company replied to a question if they copied Apple for their latest ultrabook, the Envy Spectre XT. "There are similarities in a way, not due to Apple but due to the way technologies developed. Apple may like to think that they own silver, but they don't. In no way did HP try to mimic Apple. In life there are a lot of similarities." It's an ultrabook, a category of laptops defined by Intel. Coincidentally, Intel also developed the internals of the MacBook Air. These products are looking relatively similar because their internals have been designed by the same damn company. Get over it.
Thread beginning with comment 517501
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
galvanash
Member since:
2006-01-25

I never contested that Apple didn't play an important role. All I said was that the current ultrabooks designs are dictated by Intel's specs, and Intel ALSO made the spec for the original Air (and current Airs) which started the ultrabook trend.


[Bolding Mine]... Please provide any evidence at all that what I bolded in your comment is true... Intel made a custom CPU package for Apple in 2008 - that does not constitute a "spec".

Therefore, the claim that ultrabook makers are copying Apple is ridiculous. Of course these machines are going to look the same; they are the exact same hardware in the the same minute space!


...yet somehow Apple was able to go through 4 generations of hardware (switch from rotational to SSD, switch from chipset-integrated GPU to external GPU then to CPU integrated GPU, switch between chipsets and GPU vendors, entirely different CPU generation, etc) while retaining what externally is almost exactly the same design.

I'm sorry, but the insides don't dictate the outsides - at all. in any way. The computer industry is absolutely filled with evidence to the contrary.

That doesn't mean I care whether or not HP copied Apple's design. I don't. I just get the impression from the way you write about this that you think the first Air was released in 2011 and the ones that came before it somehow never existed... Yes, the current generation device is more or less based on the ultrabook spec - but that spec was more or less modeled on the previous generation Airs. Maybe not literally but at least in the sense that Apple's success with that product prompted Intel to try and capitalize on it.

The only point Im trying to make is that the similarity between HP's device and The Air is exactly the same whether or not you are talking about the current Air or the one from 5 years ago. Since that one has no relationship at all with the ultrabook spec... I don't understand the premise of your argument.

Edited 2012-05-09 21:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

[Bolding Mine]... Please provide any evidence at all that what I bolded in your comment is true... Intel made a custom CPU package for Apple in 2008 - that does not constitute a "spec".


There's a link in the item. Did you read it?

...yet somehow Apple was able to go through 4 generations of hardware (switch from rotational to SSD, switch from chipset-integrated GPU to external GPU then to CPU integrated GPU, switch between chipsets and GPU vendors, entirely different CPU generation, etc) while retaining what externally is almost exactly the same design.


...meanwhile skipping processors, chipsets, and GPUs that did NOT fit inside the case.

Maybe not literally but at least in the sense that Apple's success with that product prompted Intel to try and capitalize on it.


It went like this:

Apple and Intel entered into a close partnership when Apple switched to Intel, and Apple would get first-mover advantage to new Intel chips if they wanted to.

Apple then asked Intel: please design and build a processor, chipset, and GPU that can fit inside a small and thin laptop. Intel said okay - but after a certain period of exclusivity, we do want to sell this design to others, else it's simply not worth our while.

And so they did. Hence, current ultrabooks look like MacBook Airs. This isn't rocket science.

Reply Parent Score: 0

galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

"[Bolding Mine]... Please provide any evidence at all that what I bolded in your comment is true... Intel made a custom CPU package for Apple in 2008 - that does not constitute a "spec".


There's a link in the item. Did you read it?

"

Yes I read it... And I see no evidence from the linked article that Intel did anything but provide Apple with alternate packaging of existing designs, and it was existing CPU/chipset designs - there was nothing at all new about them outside of the packaging being physically smaller.

How does that constitute the end result being a "designed by Intel" product???? You do understand that CPUs are routinely available in difference packages don't you? Yes, they gave them a physically smaller CPU and chipset - so what? That isn't designing a product... The article even quotes Intel as saying it was packaging originally designed for a different CPU line. Sounds like Intel more or less just filling an order to me, at best giving Apple some new tech in advance of others.

...meanwhile skipping processors, chipsets, and GPUs that did NOT fit inside the case.


That was my point all along - Apple had a design they wanted to make into a product - what Intel did was deliver tech that meet Apple's requirements. And when Apple wasn't happy with Intel's first solution they went to Nvidia for the 2nd round. Does that make the 2nd gen. Air an Nvidia designed product? After all the 2nd gen Air was almost universally considered a far better product than the 1st... Do we now give Nvidia all the credit for the product?

Apple doesn't base their designs purely on what goes into them - they design for what they think they can get their partners to provide for them and then ask their partners to supply it.

Ultrabooks (as in those choosing to use Intel's spec), on the other hand, ARE designed around their internals - it is a published spec after all.

This is why I think it is intellectually dishonest to call an Air an "Intel Design" - even the current ones - because the design predates the specification... It just happens that the specification meet the design requirements in Apples case.

It went like this:

Apple and Intel entered into a close partnership when Apple switched to Intel, and Apple would get first-mover advantage to new Intel chips if they wanted to.


True so far.

Apple then asked Intel: please design and build a processor, chipset, and GPU that can fit inside a small and thin laptop. Intel said okay


still going strong...

- but after a certain period of exclusivity, we do want to sell this design to others, else it's simply not worth our while.


And then you go off into pure conjecture...

Again... Do you have ANY evidence of this??? I have never seen anything printed anywhere by anyone backing that up... Apple simply asked Intel to provide them with a CPU/chipset in packaging that allow them to reduce their PCB footprint. Where is evidence that this involved a quid pro quo? It has nothing to do with design at all. Apple saying "we want smaller shit" and Intel supplying it does not suddenly make the design of the resulting product Intel's...

And so they did. Hence, current ultrabooks look like MacBook Airs. This isn't rocket science.


I didn't say it was rocket science, I said it was bullshit.

Edited 2012-05-09 23:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3