Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 10th May 2012 23:26 UTC
Intel Intel CEO Paul Otellini on Windows 8 x86 and Windows 8 ARM: "We have the advantage of the incumbency, advantage of the legacy support. Not just in terms of applications but devices." Yes, because the lack of their favourite Windows applications was really a massive hurdle for Apple and its ill-fated iPad effort from a few years ago. Anyone remember that thing?
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Re: the iPad dig
by MechaShiva on Fri 11th May 2012 00:36 UTC
MechaShiva
Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't think it's something you can dismiss with throwaway comment like that. The iPad, for all intents and purposes, was a new device and Apple wore that perception like a badge. Microsoft, on the other hand, is trying to extend the Windows brand to devices where there really is no logical connection.

In this regard, Otellini is spot on. A Windows device without any connection to Windows legacy software is a Windows device in what way? Familiar usage patterns, familiar software? If Intel has/will have ultra low power chips that can run Windows proper in a similar form factor to the iPad, Windows RT is dead in the water.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Re: the iPad dig
by some1 on Fri 11th May 2012 03:16 in reply to "Re: the iPad dig"
some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

Except that using existing Windows applications in tablet form factor is a pain, as Microsoft itself has learned in their numerous TabletPC attempts going back more than 10 years ago.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Re: the iPad dig
by Alfman on Fri 11th May 2012 05:05 in reply to "RE: Re: the iPad dig"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Actually I would have like to own one, but the market wasn't there at the price they were demanding. Had they closed the outrageous price gap between laptops and tablets, I think the early tablet market would have succeeded.

Also, I wouldn't say they lacked really cool ideas, take courier for example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXiYtMnjAmc

It's interesting to note this was well before apple's tablet and was publically
scheduled to be available by 2009. Inside reports I've read said it was well on it's way to being a real product but was canceled for undisclosed reasons. One theory was microsoft's lack of interest in becoming a direct hardware supplier for customers and licensing disagreements with 3rd party hardware vendors. Another theory is just poor executive decision making. Either way it opened up the window :-) for apple's tablet and the rest is history.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Re: the iPad dig
by Verunks on Fri 11th May 2012 08:43 in reply to "RE: Re: the iPad dig"
Verunks Member since:
2007-04-02

yeah using windows programs with touch might not be the best experience but this is not the same as old tablets where the os was just the standard windows xp with touch input added on top, it's an os optimized for touch input where you can even run legacy applications, if you need them.
For example let's say that vmware doesn't make a metro vsphere client, you can just use the windows one

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Re: the iPad dig
by cyrilleberger on Fri 11th May 2012 06:52 in reply to "Re: the iPad dig"
cyrilleberger Member since:
2006-02-01

I don't think it's something you can dismiss with throwaway comment like that. The iPad, for all intents and purposes, was a new device and Apple wore that perception like a badge.


Also, when the netbook were launched, they were shipped with a Linux system, and the #1 complain was that users could not install their favourite application. So it is likely that if people buy a ARM desktop/laptop, they might expect to be able to install non-metro application. Especially since I doubt non-geek people will understand the difference between ARM and x86 (they might actually believe that ARM is like AMD, a cheap version of Intel).

Tablets are an entirely different class of product, so buyers did not have the expectation to be able to run classic applications on them.

Microsoft, on the other hand, is trying to extend the Windows brand to devices where there really is no logical connection.


There is the slight possibility that they are actually switching the brand from Windows to Metro. Which, unlike what most geek thinks, is not something that can happen overnight. Especially when you want to replace such a strong brand as "Windows", so for now, it is "Windows Metro", but I would not be surprised if for the next release it is just "Metro".

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Re: the iPad dig
by bassbeast on Mon 14th May 2012 08:33 in reply to "RE: Re: the iPad dig"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

And if they do it will be suicide as billions of dollars worth of systems and applications rely on X86 Windows.

More likely from watching what has been happening under Ballmer's reign at MSFT this is likely to be a "Hail Mary" to try to get them a chunk of the smartphone market but IMHO its a dumb move. You don't crap on a billion dollar cash cow to try to jam your foot in the door of a market where you have ZERO strengths and has two incumbents that are both very powerful AND have better brand identities. hell even my 71 year old non tech dad knows what Android is and Apple is a juggernaut in mobile with iPhone and iPad.

Look we ALL know why they are doing it, its because the MHz wars are over and the PC is a mature platform while ARM is just starting a MHz war of its own. But MSFT had tried repeatedly to break into that market, first with winCE then Zune and then WinPhone 7 but all their flailing and billions wasted barely got them even 5% of the market.

So I'd say Intel is right as the ONLY reason people turn to the windows brand is for Windows X86 programs which ARM simply won't have. if this strategy was gonna work it would have with WinPhone 7 which is a fine smartphone OS, but Android and Apple simply have the better brands in this space with much larger appstores and better product recognition.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Re: the iPad dig
by ilovebeer on Fri 11th May 2012 18:05 in reply to "Re: the iPad dig"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Microsoft, on the other hand, is trying to extend the Windows brand to devices where there really is no logical connection.

So what. They can expand their brand in any way they see fit.

In this regard, Otellini is spot on. A Windows device without any connection to Windows legacy software is a Windows device in what way?

Legacy Windows software has nothing to do with anything. There's no requirement that a new Windows product must support legacy Windows software.

"Windows" is nothing more than the name of a product line. Microsoft decides what's "Windows" and what isn't. They make the rules when it comes to their own products, naming, etc. I think people forget that fact from time to time.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Re: the iPad dig
by bert64 on Sat 12th May 2012 09:41 in reply to "Re: the iPad dig"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

A device thats advertised as windows will lead customers to believe it has the same capabilities as any other windows device, when they find out it doesn't then they will be angry...

I have seen several people buy windows mobile or windows ce based devices expecting to be able to install the same apps they used on their desktop, this leaves a bad taste in the mouth.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Re: the iPad dig
by ilovebeer on Sat 12th May 2012 14:22 in reply to "RE: Re: the iPad dig"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

A device thats advertised as windows will lead customers to believe it has the same capabilities as any other windows device, when they find out it doesn't then they will be angry...

Advertising Windows products as Windows products is not what could mislead people. Customers who assume and don't bother to actually know what they're buying is what misleads them. Aside of that, every version of Windows, in every iteration has different capabilities so if they haven't learned that by now, well, ...........

I have seen several people buy windows mobile or windows ce based devices expecting to be able to install the same apps they used on their desktop, this leaves a bad taste in the mouth.

...And it's nobody's fault but their own. Most people have done that at some point -- purchased a product without really doing their homework, only to discover it wasn't actually what they needed/wanted/intended to buy. Oops! Lesson learned for them I guess.

Reply Parent Score: 3