Linked by diegocg on Sun 13th May 2012 23:48 UTC
Linux Lennart Poettering, the author of systemd, has announced: "I just put a first version of a wiki document together that lists a couple of easy optimizations to get your boot times down to [less than] 2s. It also includes a list of suggested things to hack on to get even quicker boot-ups."
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When will we see this in Fedora?
by ozonehole on Mon 14th May 2012 00:13 UTC
ozonehole
Member since:
2006-01-07

I'm very interested in systemd, and getting boot time down to 2 seconds sounds pretty amazing. However, current version of Fedora is way slower, even slower than Ubuntu's Upstart. So I'm wondering if this new super-fast boot setup will find its way into the next Fedora release? I'm currently an Ubuntu user, but I'd give Fedora another look if they could come up with a 2-second boot-up.

If such amazing boot times can be achieved, maybe Mark Shuttleworth would reconsider systemd. It's kind of troubling that Linux initialization is becoming ever more fragmented with SysVinit, Upstart, OpenRC and systemd all competing for mind-share. That's got to be making things more complicated for developers.

Reply Score: 2

jessesmith Member since:
2010-03-11

I have had similar results. On my hardware Ubuntu (with Upstart) boots faster than Fedora (with systemd). Not by a lot, I wouldn't say the time difference is either large, or important. However, it does make me question whether systemd is worth the effort to implement and adopt.

Reply Parent Score: 1

robmv Member since:
2006-08-12

If you read the list, you will notice that some of the things that slow down systemd boot time is support for advanced storage options in Fedora, like LVM, iScsi, etc. Fedora defaults are the problem (for a pure desktop user) not systemd

Reply Parent Score: 1

allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10


It's kind of troubling that Linux initialization is becoming ever more fragmented with SysVinit, Upstart, OpenRC and systemd all competing for mind-share. That's got to be making things more complicated for developers.


That's the default behavior of competing Linux distributions. Touting features here and there, but its nothing new, almost all of these features are only updated versions of software packages. Also on the GNOME camp, they are still debating of where to put the POWER OFF button, or to hide it with a modifier key. Instead of improving the desktop for "home users", "developers(ISV)", "business users" they are all busy of the things that only they themselves(internal developers) will only care. Save for Ubuntu, I think the strength of Ubuntu is a user-centric disto.

Reply Parent Score: 3