Linked by diegocg on Sun 13th May 2012 23:48 UTC
Linux Lennart Poettering, the author of systemd, has announced: "I just put a first version of a wiki document together that lists a couple of easy optimizations to get your boot times down to [less than] 2s. It also includes a list of suggested things to hack on to get even quicker boot-ups."
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RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Drumhellar on Mon 14th May 2012 02:02 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Drumhellar"
Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

Functionality is more important to me than raw login speed, so I'll stick with KDE. I admit that I haven't really investigated improving login times under Kubuntu, but it is something I maintain with Windows. I think I'll take a peek later tonight.

Windows is especially bad, since it seems that every time you install or update something, commercial software wants to add something that launches automatically, so every time I install something I fire up msconfig and check to make sure only what I want to launch at startup actually launches.
Apple is especially bad. I have banished it from my desktop. If I want to add something to my iPod, I fire up a virtual machine dedicated to iTunes.

Speaking of which, I just removed and added a bunch of software, so I'd better check...

EDIT: Then again, KDE can be overwhelming with features, so I think I'll check it out...

Edited 2012-05-14 02:04 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar
by ssokolow on Mon 14th May 2012 02:21 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Functionality is more important to me than raw login speed, so I'll stick with KDE. I admit that I haven't really investigated improving login times under Kubuntu, but it is something I maintain with Windows. I think I'll take a peek later tonight.

[...]

EDIT: Then again, KDE can be overwhelming with features, so I think I'll check it out...


Since you're on Kubuntu, I'd suggest installing LXDE with `apt-get install lubuntu-desktop`. That'll give you a Lubuntu option in KDM with a more polished, comfortable default theme and configuration than bare LXDE.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Drumhellar on Mon 14th May 2012 02:25 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Thanks. I'll do that tonight.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar
by gan17 on Mon 14th May 2012 03:47 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

Functionality is more important to me than raw login speed .....

Use a tiler (Xmonad, dwm...etc). You'll get both speed and functionality. ;)

Edited 2012-05-14 03:48 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

Gullible Jones Member since:
2006-05-23

I realize you're not being serious, but... That is not the same kind of functionality. Way too much stuff on Linux is tied to heavy desktop environments - networking and automatic power management in particular stand out. Getting this stuff working under a standalone WM tends to require extensive configuration or ugly, insecure hacks.

(And in the case of NetworkManager, it doesn't work in a command line environment, period. nmcli is a complete joke.)

Pretty annoying. Especially seeing as laptops, which could theoretically benefit the most from a lightweight environment, are currently left with crippled functionality.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Drumhellar
by ssokolow on Mon 14th May 2012 04:19 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

"Functionality is more important to me than raw login speed .....

Use a tiler (Xmonad, dwm...etc). You'll get both speed and functionality. ;)
"

The funny thing is, I've actually been meaning to swap out LXPanel and Openbox for AwesomeWM for a while now... I just haven't had time to implement the hybrid tiling/floating mouse/keyboard interaction I want in Lua yet.

...and I'm not sure whether the Lua API for AwesomeWM is powerful enough to implement drag handles for adjusting the tile sizes. I might have to expedite my plans to learn Haskell and just de-GNOMEify Bluetile.

(Bluetile is a attempt to make XMonad friendly enough for the average GNOME 2.x user but it's too GNOMEy for me even though it implements more of the features I want in a tiler than any other tiler config I've ever seen)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Drumhellar
by Drumhellar on Mon 14th May 2012 07:11 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

I don't have enough screen real estate to feel comfortable with a tiling WM.

Windows and KDE both snap windows to the left and right sides of the screen easily enough. That is useful often enough for what I mostly do at the moment. Most of my other tasks would tend to be maximized, even on high-res screens.

I miss having a 1600x1200 display, but my computer now is a laptop with a 1366x768 display.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar
by 1c3d0g on Mon 14th May 2012 14:37 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Drumhellar"
1c3d0g Member since:
2005-07-06

You could try razor-qt, a new KDE-like environment without the bloat.

http://razor-qt.org/

Then again, if functionality is what you're after, perhaps KDE is exactly what you need. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Drumhellar
by ssokolow on Mon 14th May 2012 14:48 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Drumhellar"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

It doesn't really start quickly, but there's also that maintained fork of KDE 3.5 named Trinity which is pretty lightweight once it is started.

http://trinitydesktop.org/

Reply Parent Score: 2