Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th May 2012 18:28 UTC
Apple "I think that Apple could be just as strong and good and be open, but how can you challenge it when a company is making that much money?", Wozniak told a crowd in Sydney, according to ITNews. They'd score so many brownie points the internet would explode.
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Facts ($$$) prove that closed works
by Shamster on Mon 14th May 2012 19:45 UTC
Shamster
Member since:
2012-05-14

Via it's financial success, Apple has proven that you can keep your hardware and software proprietary if the marketing and quality meets the needs of end users. This doesn't mean that there are no crashes, that there are no security issues, or even that it's the best operating system and hardware combination.

The reasons people make purchases are a lot more complicated than simple facts and right now, Apple has tapped into the right combination of efforts. There is simply no justification to gamble on the effect of an "open" company right now.

Edited 2012-05-14 19:52 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Facts prove that you can keep your software open-sourced and even if it is top-notch quality, that single quality makes it the best operating system: millions of linux servers and supercalculators, millions of Android phones (and others) with features and hardware iPhone users can only dream of at every price point, tens of thousands of machines, robots, planes, copters, capters, whole PhD projects powered by Linux and Arduino.

All that without discontinuity for the last twenty years and counting.


Just take that "facts" that suit you more. Live happily ever after in your confirmation bias bubble.

Now, maybe, if you are a bit curious about the real details of how people buy, you may be interested in taking design and marketing lessons. That should clear a few things up.

But never, ever, mistake a "trend" for a "sound success".

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

"Supercalculators" - thank you for that term, I shall use that ;)

machines, robots, planes, copters, capters

But... planes, copters - not really (more stuff like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrity_(operating_system)#INTEGRITY-178B ). Machines and robots - depends (also on dependability); generally, there are many many more with some embedded OS (also open source among those, of course)

And what's a capter? ;p (quick search didn't really give anything beyond http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/capter which didn't really help)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Via it's financial success, Apple has proven that you can keep your hardware and software proprietary if the marketing and quality meets the needs of end users. This doesn't mean that there are no crashes, that there are no security issues, or even that it's the best operating system and hardware combination.

The reasons people make purchases are a lot more complicated than simple facts and right now, Apple has tapped into the right combination of efforts. There is simply no justification to gamble on the effect of an "open" company right now.


Facts have also proven that open works too:
* Redhat
* Virtualbox / Xen / KVM
* Firefox
* Apache
* MySQL
..and i could go on.

However I agree that there's no point in Apple open sourcing their products. They'd gain nothing but nerd points.

I'd rather see Apple open up their compatibility:
* Don't litigate against the jailbreak community (they don't have to support either, but don't criminalising users for wanting more out of their hardware)
* Allow Hackintoshes (again, they don't have to support them, just allow users the choice of an unsupported home build or a fully supported official Mac)
* And most importantly, cut all the petty bullshit App Store restrictions! Allow users to install outside of the store (even if it's an option that needs to be manually enabled), allow software to link to purchase pages etc, allow adult content.

Apple are just software manufacturers - period. So I don't want to be policed by the developers of the software I used any more than I want car manufacturers to tell me where I can or cannot drive to and what music I'm authorised to listen to on route.

Edited 2012-05-15 08:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

As far as I am aware they haven't sued anyone from the iOS jail breaking community. In fact, some have landed a job at Apple.

But I don't see why they should allow the ability to freely install whatever you want. Apple will miss their cut on any sales, malware/crapware can infect iOS devices and damage the brand image, app developers might not like it being too easy for people to install cracked apps.

Reply Parent Score: 0