Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th May 2012 22:49 UTC
Windows For weeks - if not months - I've been trying to come up with a way to succinctly and accurately explain why, exactly, Windows 8 rubs me the wrong way, usability-wise. I think I finally got it.
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RE[6]: um
by Lorin on Mon 14th May 2012 23:53 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: um"
Lorin
Member since:
2010-04-06

My company did the same, 200k licenses Microsoft will not be collecting for any longer, there are many vendors that sell PC's without an OS so no big deal.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: um
by kaiwai on Tue 15th May 2012 05:33 in reply to "RE[6]: um"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

My company did the same, 200k licenses Microsoft will not be collecting for any longer, there are many vendors that sell PC's without an OS so no big deal.


If your organisation purchases 200,000 licences (or is it $200,000? please be precise rather than throwing around meaningless figures) then your organisation is run by morons because almost every enterprise customer:

1) Leases their computers and is signed up for a Microsoft licensing scheme that gives them the latest version of all their software for a set price per year.

OR

2) Buy their computers without an operating system and is signed up for a Microsoft licensing scheme that gives them the latest version of all their software for a set price per year.

It is clear to me that either the organisation you work for is run by morons or the scenario you gave is a load of crap - I have a hunch that it is the later rather than the former.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[8]: um
by JAlexoid on Tue 15th May 2012 08:42 in reply to "RE[7]: um"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

It's probably 200k units of money. There are not many companies that actually have that many employees.

That said, IBM only started rolling out Win7 in 2011(skipping Vista entirely) - that's well over 300'000 and as much as 400'000. And I can say with 100% certainty that Win8 will be skipped at at least 1 company that has more than 200k active licenses.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[8]: um
by TemporalBeing on Tue 15th May 2012 19:21 in reply to "RE[7]: um"
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

"My company did the same, 200k licenses Microsoft will not be collecting for any longer, there are many vendors that sell PC's without an OS so no big deal.


If your organisation purchases 200,000 licences (or is it $200,000? please be precise rather than throwing around meaningless figures) then your organisation is run by morons because
"

Or they simply manage the whole thing themselves. 200k systems is not hard to manage with Linux/Unix. It is much more difficult to manage with Windows.

$200k worth of systems is only about 100k systems; still a large order, and would still put them on a Volume License with their IT managing it.

almost every enterprise customer:

1) Leases their computers and is signed up for a Microsoft licensing scheme that gives them the latest version of all their software for a set price per year.


Few large companies really want the latest software all the time. They tend to favor moving forward with the software versions at their own leisure. Regardless of if they are leasing or buying the computers.

2) Buy their computers without an operating system and is signed up for a Microsoft licensing scheme that gives them the latest version of all their software for a set price per year.


Question: Have you read the Microsoft Volume Licensing Agreement? Probably not is my guess.

Why? Because even if you purchase the licenses via the Microsoft Volume License Agreement, it states that you still may not have 100% of the licensing rights you need to run Windows on the computer you are installing it onto, and they recommend that you still buy a license with the computer to ensure you do.

VLA simply makes it easy to do things like cloning disks, and pushing out new images so that IT can manage the systems. It also conveniently lets Microsoft double book each sale and claim yet another blockbuster release that breaks all records.

Reply Parent Score: 2