Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th May 2012 22:49 UTC
Windows For weeks - if not months - I've been trying to come up with a way to succinctly and accurately explain why, exactly, Windows 8 rubs me the wrong way, usability-wise. I think I finally got it.
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Desktop/Laptop Users
by snip3rm00n on Tue 15th May 2012 05:09 UTC
snip3rm00n
Member since:
2011-06-08

Its my opinion that Windows 8 will alienate desktop and laptop users who do not have a touch screen. The Metro UI is perfect for a tablet and touch screen devices, but that's it. The fact that Windows 8 has Explorer seems more as an afterthought to keep those without a touchscreen happy, however it isn't very user friendly without the start button or orb. Removal of the start button really makes Explorer not worth keeping since now shortcuts for Explorer only apps will either need to be in folders on te desktop or on Metro which is difficult to manage with a keyboard and mouse.

Microsoft should have two different versions of Windows 8, or prompt at install if someone has a laptop or desktop without a touchscreen. If the customer chooses the version where they have a touch screen then have it boot to Metro. If they chose the version without a touchscreen it should boot to Explorer that has a Start button/orb and on the start menu have an option to enter Metro.

Basically make Windows and it's default GUI specific to the device it's being run on. This would make both desktop/laptop users happy since they won't be stuck with Metro by default, and it'll make tablet/touchscreen users happy as they have an interface built around Windows geared specifically for them.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Desktop/Laptop Users
by MollyC on Tue 15th May 2012 05:27 in reply to "Desktop/Laptop Users"
MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

Microsft has stated that they think that within a couple of years it will be hard to buy a computer without a touch screen display, so that's what they're going with. I agree that those without touch screens might be best off staying with Windows 7 until time comes for them to get a new computer.

P.S.
I will note that Windows 8 desktop environment does have some nice advantages and advancements over Windows 7, such that if one is going to just stick with "classic" apps (and they pin their most common apps to the task bar so as to avoid the start screen), then it might still be beneficial for such users to upgrade from Windows 7 to WIndows 8.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Desktop/Laptop Users
by Brendan on Tue 15th May 2012 07:44 in reply to "RE: Desktop/Laptop Users"
Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

Microsft has stated that they think that within a couple of years it will be hard to buy a computer without a touch screen display, so that's what they're going with. I agree that those without touch screens might be best off staying with Windows 7 until time comes for them to get a new computer.


Regardless of whether the screen is a touch screen or not; desktop users will never want to use touch. In terms of ergonomics, it's a massive disaster unless the screen is tiny (e.g. small enough to allow you to touch anywhere on the screen while holding the screen in your hands).

See how long you can make your hands hover in front of a large vertical surface, or hover above a large horizontal surface, before your arms get tired. Make sure you don't accidentally touch the surface (e.g. rest your wrist on the screen, send a bunch of files to the recycle bin because your shirt sleeve was dragging, etc). Now imagine trying to do "hover hands" for 8+ hours per day.

- Brendan

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Desktop/Laptop Users
by WereCatf on Tue 15th May 2012 11:08 in reply to "RE: Desktop/Laptop Users"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Microsft has stated that they think that within a couple of years it will be hard to buy a computer without a touch screen display, so that's what they're going with. I agree that those without touch screens might be best off staying with Windows 7 until time comes for them to get a new computer.


A 24" (or larger) touch-screen display sitting on a desk would be extremely inefficient. Not to mention if you had multiple ones.

A desktop display is not hand-held, it is further away on the desk and as such if you were to use any touch gestures you'd have to reach quite far out. Now, imagine doing gestures some 300 times a day, every single time stretching your arm out to make some small gesture, does that really sound like good workflow?

I will note that Windows 8 desktop environment does have some nice advantages and advancements over Windows 7, such that if one is going to just stick with "classic" apps (and they pin their most common apps to the task bar so as to avoid the start screen), then it might still be beneficial for such users to upgrade from Windows 7 to WIndows 8.


Could you elaborate on these advantages and advancements? I'm honestly curious. When I tried out the preview I didn't notice anything that was of any benefit to me personally, but I didn't use it for long so I could obviously have just missed something.

Reply Parent Score: 3