Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th May 2012 18:28 UTC
Apple "I think that Apple could be just as strong and good and be open, but how can you challenge it when a company is making that much money?", Wozniak told a crowd in Sydney, according to ITNews. They'd score so many brownie points the internet would explode.
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Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

"I installed this great system tweak from a repository my buddy gave me, but I can't remember what it was, and now my iPod Touch won't boot."


"Sorry, your warranty is no longer valid."


"I paid $30 for this POS software and it won't install on my 15-year old Pentium 2! I want a refund!"


"Sorry, that is not a supported system."

Why do people think this is rocket science? Apple don't have to support these systems. Besides, making your own hackintosh from your own retail DVD is perfectly legal. It's just that it's not legal for someone else to make and sell hackintoshes.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Soulbender,

"Why do people think this is rocket science? Apple don't have to support these systems. Besides, making your own hackintosh from your own retail DVD is perfectly legal."


Legal yes, you're almost certainly not breaking a law. But it is against the TOS, so it becomes a civil matter. The big question is whether these kinds of license agreements would stand up in court. Given that courts are all over the place these days, I honestly don't think I could predict any outcome. Since apple has not been prosecuting end users for violations, we may never find out.


"It's just that it's not legal for someone else to make and sell hackintoshes."

It was very long ago and I barely remember the case at all, but I don't remember there being a law against what psystar was doing? At the end, psystar was selling hardware, macos, and it's own shim software *separately* so customers were installing macos themselves, and to be honest I was very tempted to buy one myself. But apple kept suing and kept winning till there was nothing left of it's little hardware competitor.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

The big question is whether these kinds of license agreements would stand up in court.


I'm pretty sure post-sales restrictions aren't legal and that's what this essentially is. Presuming that I have purchased a copy of a a DVD set Apple has no valid contractual means by which to restrict what I do in private. It's not like I'm renting or leasing the DVD's.
Granted I'm not entirely up on the DMCA but since I don't live in a corporate fascist state I don't have to.

Reply Parent Score: 3