Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th May 2012 18:28 UTC
Apple "I think that Apple could be just as strong and good and be open, but how can you challenge it when a company is making that much money?", Wozniak told a crowd in Sydney, according to ITNews. They'd score so many brownie points the internet would explode.
Thread beginning with comment 518346
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

If you modify your car or phone and make a complete mess of it, that's no problem (well, it is for you personally of course).

If you allow people, most of which aren't technical savvy, to install whatever they want on a class of devices that's currently targeted by cyber criminals an increasing number of users will experience problems and/or become victims. It would destroy the image of the device, in this case the iPhone, of being "safe" and "secure", despite if it really is.

When something sticks it can stick for a long time. Like the MessagePad's handwriting recognition which was bad in the first version and pretty good in the last one. Yet, when the MessagePad is mentioned bad handwriting recognition isn't far away from the discussion.

Windows is still associated by many as something that crashes a lot, which it doesn't since Windows 2000.

Apple has build a positive image. The public doesn't even make a fuss of any missteps they make. Antenna gate didn't prevent the iPhone 4 from becoming the best sold phone at the time, OS X is still seen as secure and even Steve is viewed as a great person despite not being very nice a lot of times. Their future products will benefit from this public perception.

Even when a product isn't really that good or original, it will get more than the benefit of the doubt. A lot of great products/ideas have failed because they were brought to market by unknown companies or ones that didn't have a better name than their competitors.

A large number would pick an Apple iPhone over a Windows Phone just based on the familiarity and brand image of Apple. Most people don't look at specs, stats or reviews.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

MOS6510,

"If you allow people, most of which aren't technical savvy, to install whatever they want on a class of devices that's currently targeted by cyber criminals an increasing number of users will experience problems and/or become victims. It would destroy the image of the device, in this case the iPhone, of being 'safe' and 'secure', despite if it really is."

That's an excuse apple may use to appease the masses, but it won't fly here. There's no technical reason apple can't make a secure platform for non-technical owners without forcefully jailing the owners who'd like control over apps they install. Regardless of what you say, prohibiting all owners from accessing their devices isn't about security, it's about control.

Reply Parent Score: 3

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Of course it's about control, Apple has always been about that.

But it's not control to enslave humanity or to annoy customers, it's to guarantee an experience. Sure, it's an Apple dictated one, but you have a choice if you like it or not. If you don't buy something else. A cheap PC running Linux can make a great system.

And I can understand people not liking it, certainly not the more adventurous users. I'm up for an adventure, but not regarding my phone or main computer. These things need to work as I don't have the luxury to spend hours fixing them and when I was younger I have been in a number of situation where I messed up my boot sector and spend hours fixing stuff.

iOS is pretty simple and it only has one way of installing software. This makes it easy for the masses. What may seem simple to you and me isn't for a lot of people. When I ask someone over the phone to type a slash or even press the Windows start button people start getting confused.

Just the thought of an app being in one app store and not in an other will confuse a lot of people a lot and they'll probably blame their iPhone and/or Apple. Hell, some would probably return their phone thinking it's broken.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

If you allow people, most of which aren't technical savvy, to install whatever they want on a class of devices that's currently targeted by cyber criminals an increasing number of users will experience problems and/or become victims. It would destroy the image of the device, in this case the iPhone, of being "safe" and "secure", despite if it really is.


Sorry, I still don't see why this magically applies to IT products and not other products. If I screw up customizing my car and it becomes unsafe it does not affect the image of the company that made the car yet if I customize my Apple product and screw up it reflects badly on Apple? Nonsense. Most people aren't car savvy and won't customize their car. They either don't do it at all or have someone competent do it for them. It's the same with phones. Most people wouldn't ever bother installing apps outside of the app store and if they did they'd be on their own.
IT (and Apple) products aren't special or significantly different from other products. If you customize them and screw up it's your fault.

Reply Parent Score: 3

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Screw them up all you like, but don't expect Apple to help you.

And IT products are very different to other things. Fiddling and messing about with them involves, mostly, nothing more than Google, a keyboard and a mouse. You can do it inside your house from your chair. It's often easy and cheap. And when things go wrong you can often restore a backup or the original firmware.

I can't think of any other category of products that people would, in large numbers, want to fiddle with. Not many people tune their fridge or extend the capacity of their couch.

Reply Parent Score: 2