Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th May 2012 18:28 UTC
Apple "I think that Apple could be just as strong and good and be open, but how can you challenge it when a company is making that much money?", Wozniak told a crowd in Sydney, according to ITNews. They'd score so many brownie points the internet would explode.
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Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

MOS6510,

"If you allow people, most of which aren't technical savvy, to install whatever they want on a class of devices that's currently targeted by cyber criminals an increasing number of users will experience problems and/or become victims. It would destroy the image of the device, in this case the iPhone, of being 'safe' and 'secure', despite if it really is."

That's an excuse apple may use to appease the masses, but it won't fly here. There's no technical reason apple can't make a secure platform for non-technical owners without forcefully jailing the owners who'd like control over apps they install. Regardless of what you say, prohibiting all owners from accessing their devices isn't about security, it's about control.

Reply Parent Score: 3

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Of course it's about control, Apple has always been about that.

But it's not control to enslave humanity or to annoy customers, it's to guarantee an experience. Sure, it's an Apple dictated one, but you have a choice if you like it or not. If you don't buy something else. A cheap PC running Linux can make a great system.

And I can understand people not liking it, certainly not the more adventurous users. I'm up for an adventure, but not regarding my phone or main computer. These things need to work as I don't have the luxury to spend hours fixing them and when I was younger I have been in a number of situation where I messed up my boot sector and spend hours fixing stuff.

iOS is pretty simple and it only has one way of installing software. This makes it easy for the masses. What may seem simple to you and me isn't for a lot of people. When I ask someone over the phone to type a slash or even press the Windows start button people start getting confused.

Just the thought of an app being in one app store and not in an other will confuse a lot of people a lot and they'll probably blame their iPhone and/or Apple. Hell, some would probably return their phone thinking it's broken.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

MOS6510,

"But it's not control to enslave humanity or to annoy customers, it's to guarantee an experience."


It's to eliminate competition. Apple bans applications that are neither a security risk nor pose a bad experience because they reduce apple's own control and give owners a choice.


"And I can understand people not liking it, certainly not the more adventurous users. I'm up for an adventure, but not regarding my phone or main computer. These things need to work as I don't have the luxury to spend hours fixing them and when I was younger I have been in a number of situation where I messed up my boot sector and spend hours fixing stuff."

Do you want me to take that seriously? That if apple gave you a choice, you'd have to spend hours fixing problems with your boot loader?

This is what bothers me with your logic: you act like the apple app store and choice are somehow exclusive. Why would users like you, when given a choice in the matter, automatically have to get a worse experience than today? They wouldn't, how your speaking makes no sense. Given a choice, you'd continue to use apple's store, end of story. There's no need to deny anyone else the choice.

Edited 2012-05-16 17:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3