Linked by Howard Fosdick on Sat 19th May 2012 08:59 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Smartphones have become the preferred computer of the masses. Sales surpassed those of personal computers in 2010, having grown over 50% per year for several years. Nearly 500 million smartphones shipped in 2011. This radically shifts the terrain in the consumer operating system competition that was, for years, firmly decided in favor of Windows. This article analyzes the New OS Wars.
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RE: Good old days
by Valhalla on Sat 19th May 2012 14:15 UTC in reply to "Good old days"
Valhalla
Member since:
2006-01-24

Agreed, also to me the term 'computer' equals a general purpose computer not particularly focused on one task and able to perform practically any computer related task, hence I have a hard time labeling Smartphones as 'computers', to me they are phones on which you can also play games.

If we are calling smartphones 'computers' then by all means all types of videogame consoles should earn the moniker 'computers' aswell.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Good old days
by MOS6510 on Sat 19th May 2012 14:46 in reply to "RE: Good old days"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I rarely use my iPhone to make calls or send traditional text messages. Making calls gets a very small slice of the usage percentage pie.

Who takes notice of how well a phone makes calls when shopping for a new one? Most people look at the apps, the camera quality, Internet speed, storage memory. Even if you place calls on a regular basis I'm sure most people also use it for a lot more.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good old days
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Sat 19th May 2012 15:45 in reply to "RE: Good old days"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Who the heck uses their smartphone primarily to make phone calls?

- Not teenagers they use sms & facebook
- Not businesses they use email

Smartphones are communication devices, I'll give you that. But isn't that how most people use their "general purpose" computers as well?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Good old days
by Valhalla on Sat 19th May 2012 16:06 in reply to "RE[2]: Good old days"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

But isn't that how most people use their "general purpose" computers as well?

I'll certainly grant you that most of those who has computers (by my definition) at home do not actually need these general purpose computers but can do fine as long as they can surf the web, play some games and do instant messaging and this is what we are seeing now with the decline of general purpose computers versus smartphones,pads etc. I am not arguing against that. I'm arguing about labeling them as 'computers'.

I think your definition of 'communication' is much more apt, and as such we can say that portable communication/gaming devices is being largely preferred over general purpose computers these days, which in turn is because the possibilities offered by a general purpose computer far exceed the needs of most end users.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Good old days
by l3v1 on Mon 21st May 2012 09:02 in reply to "RE[2]: Good old days"
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

Who the heck uses their smartphone primarily to make phone calls?


D'oh, [raises hand] I do. You know, it s smartphone ;) Since there's an internet connection wherever I am (home, work, friends, coffee shops, bars, now even on buses, trains, etc.) I almost never use the xG data connection on my phone, and I restrict using net-based functions of my phone to when I have wifi, and most of the time I'm minutes or let's say an hour from a place where I can have that. When I need phone voice communication I use my phone, and that's quite a lot of times. I only use text-based stuff (e.g. e-mail) if it's long, needs to be on record, it isn't time critical, needs attachments, and similar situations.

That doesn't mean I don't use it for other functions, e.g. writing small notes, using calendar functions, chacking the weather, etc. I don't use facebook et al. on my phone though, that'd be a wate of my time and my money simultaneously. And I like my time and my money so I don't waste either of them if I don't have to ;)

Also, not using the xG data conn. of my phone when I can (including when I'm roaming abroad, when I always disable it) saves me a lot (a lot!) of money.

Anyway, phone capabilities are important to me, including saving as much battery as possible for phone functions.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good old days
by MollyC on Sat 19th May 2012 20:23 in reply to "RE: Good old days"
MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

If we are calling smartphones 'computers' then by all means all types of videogame consoles should earn the moniker 'computers' aswell.


Well, Sony did indeed try to market the PS3 as a "supercomputer". ;) And originally it had a version of Linux that allowed for "general purpose computing", so I guess it was a "general purpose computer" before they removed "other OS".

And game consoles have browsers now, so I guess they could run web apps, and be "general purpose" to that extent.

But I don't really consider smartphones to be "computers" as such (although they are, literally). I don't consider smartphones to be in the same market as desktop or laptop computers. I consider them to be rather PDAs with communication capability.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Good old days
by WereCatf on Sun 20th May 2012 10:59 in reply to "RE: Good old days"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Agreed, also to me the term 'computer' equals a general purpose computer not particularly focused on one task and able to perform practically any computer related task, hence I have a hard time labeling Smartphones as 'computers', to me they are phones on which you can also play games.

If we are calling smartphones 'computers' then by all means all types of videogame consoles should earn the moniker 'computers' aswell.


Do define "computer" properly for me, please? Because I just don't see the difference myself anymore. I mean, atleast on Android phones you can run a full-blown Ubuntu-installation, meaning that you can do more-or-less anything that you could do on a low-power desktop. The major difference is the form factor, but that doesn make or break something as a computer.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Good old days
by dsmogor on Wed 23rd May 2012 16:14 in reply to "RE[2]: Good old days"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

That's the point, Apple couldn't bite MS stronghold on PCs so they redefined computing needs of common people. Whatever you call the device in your pocket it does lots of tasks usually associated with Windows PCs good enough and adds permanent mobility and connectivity.
From hindsight Wintel machines have allays been clunky, over-complex office workstations shoehorned to serve new-found digital lives of common people, because of lockin and misconception that everybody needs tools as powerful as MS Office on their homes.
As both internet and gaming got independent from MS, conditions for innovation have been restored.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good old days
by David on Mon 21st May 2012 04:24 in reply to "RE: Good old days"
David Member since:
1997-10-01

I'll have to throw my two cents in here, but my back-of-the-napkin calculation of my personal iPhone usage breaks down kind of like this:

phone calls: 5%
text messaging: 5%
skype calls and messaging: 5%
RSS reading: 35%
Facebook/Twitter: 15%
Web browsing: 15%
Google maps: 5%
Other apps: 10%
Movies, music, audiobooks: 5%

Looks like a computer to me.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good old days
by Glynser on Mon 21st May 2012 06:30 in reply to "RE: Good old days"
Glynser Member since:
2007-11-29

Technically, they are computers, and so are video consoles.

And if you're calling your PC at home a "general purpose computer", then you could as well call your smartphone a "pocket computer".

Reply Parent Score: 1