Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 21st May 2012 04:03 UTC
Multimedia, AV "With over 3 million downloads per episode, the HBO hit series Game of Thrones is without doubt the most pirated TV-show of the season. Data gathered by TorrentFreak shows that most of the pirates come from Australia, while London tops the list of pirate cities. But why have these people turned to BitTorrent?" Because in order to get it legally, I have to take a monthly subscription costing me €15 per month. So instead, I buy the season box sets as they come out, and download them every Monday morning in the meantime.
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RE[2]: I can't get HBO
by paolo on Mon 21st May 2012 07:01 UTC in reply to "RE: I can't get HBO"
paolo
Member since:
2010-06-03

Brit here - It's not really a licence like a driving licence, it's more like a tax under a different name.

There are plenty of arguments for/against, but for me the way its structured means we get an independent national broadcaster funded by the public that can produce some fantastic material that doesn't rely either on being a dumb audience winner (X Factor anyone?) and doesn't have to interrupt its programmes every 15mins with crappy adverts.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: I can't get HBO
by Morgan on Mon 21st May 2012 07:11 in reply to "RE[2]: I can't get HBO"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

That does make sense, I guess it's just the terminology that gets me going. Why not call a tax a tax and a license a license? But if the expense and hassle are worth the quality programming as you say, then that's good.

And I must say, some of the most entertaining and fun stuff I've ever seen comes from British television.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I can't get HBO
by Laurence on Mon 21st May 2012 07:59 in reply to "RE[3]: I can't get HBO"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

That does make sense, I guess it's just the terminology that gets me going. Why not call a tax a tax and a license a license? But if the expense and hassle are worth the quality programming as you say, then that's good.

And I must say, some of the most entertaining and fun stuff I've ever seen comes from British television.

It's not really a licence as such, it's a tax. However it's only taxed against people who own a tuned TV set - which is probably why they call it a licence.

I wouldn't say the BBC produces the best quality shows, but they do produce shows that likely wouldn't get produced under other pricing models such shows that have relatively minor appeal (eg physics documentaries that are not as heavily dumbed down, educational curriculum-based programs for students and teachers, near-impartial press reporting (which is impressive for a government station!), etc).

The TV Licence also pays for radio stations and even the BBC News' website. Essentially anything owned by the BBC is paid for via the TV Licence.

There are big debates over in the UK about whether this tax is justifiable. Mostly I'm in favour of it but I can't completely relate to those why are not. Particularly with the way how the 'Beeb' collect these taxes (essentially if you don't pay then you are assumed to be breaking the law and even bullied to the point of paying it even when you're legally not supposed to).

Edited 2012-05-21 07:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: I can't get HBO
by MrWeeble on Mon 21st May 2012 18:08 in reply to "RE[3]: I can't get HBO"
MrWeeble Member since:
2007-04-18

The reason is mainly historical. Back in the early days of broadcasting (the era of Marconi) there was very little difference between transmitting equipment and receiving equipment, and to prevent the airwaves getting cluttered it was necessary to obtain a license to operate a "Wireless Telegraphy Station". By the 20s, the majority of "stations" became domestic radios, which were incapable of transmitting, but by this time it had become a nice little earner for the government, so they instituted a separate broadcast receiving license, which is a tax in all but name (legally it is classified as a tax). In order to make it more palatable when the government took over the British Broadcasting Company and formed the British Broadcasting Corporation, it became a hypothecated tax to fund public broadcasting.

So we all know it is a tax, but are happy to call it something else because the UK tends to be reluctant to change things just to tidy things up

Reply Parent Score: 3