Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 21st May 2012 20:03 UTC
Windows For Microsoft, the traditional desktop is old news. It's on its way out, it's legacy, and the harder they claim the desktop has equal rights, the sillier it becomes. With companies, words are meaningless, it's actions that matter, and here Microsoft's actions tell the real story. The company has announced the product line-up for Visual Studio 11, and the free Express can no longer be used to create desktop applications. Message is clear.
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Your are right, Thom
by churlish_Helmut on Mon 21st May 2012 20:46 UTC
churlish_Helmut
Member since:
2010-04-12

Yes. Its a shame. Metro on Smartphones and Tablets are a big deal, but un the desktop?

I mean, i can't just think of a metro application of SPSS or Stata, thus i need them for university. And just think of self programmed applications for other scientific use? For years they will be sticked on Windows 7.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Your are right, Thom
by lucas_maximus on Mon 21st May 2012 22:00 in reply to "Your are right, Thom"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Err Visual Studio Express being Metro only, does not mean you can't run Matlab or whatever on Windows 8.

I will seriously LMAO if they have a VS11 C++ edition, after this comment.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Your are right, Thom
by l3v1 on Tue 22nd May 2012 06:24 in reply to "RE: Your are right, Thom"
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

Err Visual Studio Express being Metro only, does not mean you can't run Matlab or whatever on Windows 8.


Uhmm, because Matlab equals science? Oh my. While there are fields where Matlab could do everything (I highly doubt that), there are a lot, where it's just not enough. E.g. almost all of our coding is for scientific purposes, yet if I would need to add all my Matlab use in a year, it would most certainly be less than a month. We can't drop Windows coding, since most of our colleagues live only in Windows-land, some of us gradually move most of our coding (99% c++) to Linux. Why? Performance, stability (including less idiotic changes), and c++ compilers and good editors won't go away anytime soon.

Reply Parent Score: 4