Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 23rd May 2012 21:40 UTC
Internet Explorer This is interesting news. According to WinUnleaked.tk, and given credence by Rafael Rivera and Paul Thurrot, Adobe has given Microsoft the source code to Flash, so that Microsoft could fully integrate it into Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 8. Interesting move, and probably not a bad one considering just how popular Flash still is, especially for games.
Thread beginning with comment 519198
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Comment by ssokolow
by jessesmith on Wed 23rd May 2012 23:18 UTC in reply to "Comment by ssokolow"
jessesmith
Member since:
2010-03-11

Adobe is not favouring Chrome over other browsers. They are making Flash available for anyone who adopts that plug-in standard. Any browser teams willing to implement the feature will be able to run future versions of Flash on Linux. Chrome just happens to be the first to do so.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow
by lemur2 on Wed 23rd May 2012 23:37 in reply to "RE: Comment by ssokolow"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Adobe is not favouring Chrome over other browsers. They are making Flash available for anyone who adopts that plug-in standard. Any browser teams willing to implement the feature will be able to run future versions of Flash on Linux. Chrome just happens to be the first to do so.


So why doesn't Adobe hand over the source code to Flash to Mozilla, Opera and Apple? Why doesn't Adobe simply release it under an OSI-approved license?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow
by WorknMan on Thu 24th May 2012 00:54 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13


So why doesn't Adobe hand over the source code to Flash to Mozilla, Opera and Apple? Why doesn't Adobe simply release it under an OSI-approved license?


As long as there was one, and only one version of Flash, tweaked only when absolutely necessary to make it cross-platform, and not 30 different forks of it.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow
by lucas_maximus on Thu 24th May 2012 09:52 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Because they sell tools such as Adobe Flash Creator, if they open sourced it they would have incompatible forks and any content made with Flash Creator wouldn't work correctly.

This would most likely piss off many of their existing customers.

Edited 2012-05-24 09:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow
by henderson101 on Thu 24th May 2012 10:17 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

So why doesn't Adobe hand over the source code to Flash to Mozilla, Opera and Apple? Why doesn't Adobe simply release it under an OSI-approved license?


Opensourcing isn't a magic bullet. It will undermine Adobe's business model (and if you license the code from them, they have always allowed external companies to use the Flash engine.) You may not like or agree with Adobe creating closed source software and platforms, but you need to appreciate that changing the model for a specific product line is not done on a whim.

I'm guessing all of the companies you list could also license the source from Adobe. I also assume they don't because Adobe provide a free plugin for the majority of the world's consumer platforms. Of those excluded, many specifically do not support Flash by choice (iOS) or have some kind of support (Linux via Chrome.)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow
by darkcoder on Thu 24th May 2012 00:14 in reply to "RE: Comment by ssokolow"
darkcoder Member since:
2006-07-14

Source code NOT EQUALS plugin

Looks like Microsoft actually read all the flame comments they got when announced Win8 will be flash-less a month or two ago.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow
by 0brad0 on Thu 24th May 2012 01:15 in reply to "RE: Comment by ssokolow"
0brad0 Member since:
2007-05-05

Adobe is not favouring Chrome over other browsers. They are making Flash available for anyone who adopts that plug-in standard. Any browser teams willing to implement the feature will be able to run future versions of Flash on Linux. Chrome just happens to be the first to do so.


Kinda hard when the plugin does not exist. You must be living under a rock. Adobe will no longer support Flash on Linux, mobile devices (phones / tablets, etc.) or embedded devices (media players, etc.).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow
by lucas_maximus on Thu 24th May 2012 09:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

No the NPAPI version, Pepper API is going to be supported by Google (via Chrome) on Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow
by ssokolow on Thu 24th May 2012 05:37 in reply to "RE: Comment by ssokolow"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Adobe is not favouring Chrome over other browsers. They are making Flash available for anyone who adopts that plug-in standard. Any browser teams willing to implement the feature will be able to run future versions of Flash on Linux. Chrome just happens to be the first to do so.


More like the only one, at present. Last I heard, Mozilla decided that they weren't going to implement Pepper because Google did as they do with Android, unilaterally designed it, and said "Here it is, Take it or leave it."

Edited 2012-05-24 05:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow
by lucas_maximus on Thu 24th May 2012 14:43 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

More like the only one, at present. Last I heard, Mozilla decided that they weren't going to implement Pepper because Google did as they do with Android, unilaterally designed it, and said "Here it is, Take it or leave it."


How dare Google actually solve the problem, rather than just campaigning for the end of Flash.

Reply Parent Score: 3