Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 28th May 2012 03:53 UTC
General Development FuriousFanBoys interviews Ben Goertzel regarding Artificial Intelligence. Ben started the OpenCog project (an open sourced AI non-profit), acts as an adviser to the Singularity University, and currently bounces back between Hong Kong and Maryland building in-game AI.
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RE: Memetics
by Fergy on Mon 28th May 2012 05:18 UTC in reply to "Memetics"
Fergy
Member since:
2006-04-10

* I use "consciousness" and not "intelligence" deliberately, because what is traditionally considered "intelligent" has already been achieved in machines.

What people mean by AI is thinking like a human. Computers can't think like a human yet.

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RE[2]: Memetics
by kwan_e on Mon 28th May 2012 05:49 in reply to "RE: Memetics"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

"* I use "consciousness" and not "intelligence" deliberately, because what is traditionally considered "intelligent" has already been achieved in machines.

What people mean by AI is thinking like a human. Computers can't think like a human yet.
"

That's why I go on to say that I don't think the term represents accurately what we actually mean and that it's a misnomer and a shifting goalpost and a whole lot of other unfavourable things.

Computers can't think like a human yet. But I would argue humans don't think like a human yet either. I've never met any people in significant numbers that uses the whole of human experience in their "intelligence". They mostly use a very rigid subset that they don't change because that's how they were raised, or they haven't considered other ways of thinking.*

And a higher intelligence would say we're not intelligent because we don't think like them.

It brings up another question: why on earth would we consider an AI to be insufficient if it doesn't match a human? They exceed humans in many other tasks already.

This is why I would like to differentiate between consciousness and intelligence. Otherwise it's just playing tennis without the net.

* One interesting thing I found, when learning the basic search algorithms, is how many people actually do just restrict themselves to one kind of search in their attempt to think. And mostly they go for greedy depth first search. They go right for the line of thinking they think will get them results quickest. Whatever their internal algorithm churns up must be the correct thought because it took them a lot of effort and a lot of statements of subsequents. Even people who consider themselves "geeks" or "nerds" often think in a quasi-greedy-depth-first-search.

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RE[3]: Memetics
by zima on Mon 28th May 2012 06:09 in reply to "RE[2]: Memetics"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

But I would argue humans don't think like a human yet either. I've never met any people in significant numbers that uses the whole of human experience in their "intelligence". They mostly use a very rigid subset [...]
It brings up another question: why on earth would we consider an AI to be insufficient if it doesn't match a human? They exceed humans in many other tasks already.

I think people go even further - they tend to expect from an AI to beat exceptional human, maybe even "the best" one...

...while AI is really more about being better than average human, inexpensively mass-producing and distributing its expertise. That is sufficient to bring improvement to the world.

Sure, AI defeated chess world champion only in 1997 - but I suspect it could beat most humans quite a bit before that.
(heck, I remember that for me, then a small kid, some C64 chess program was a challenge ;) )

Edited 2012-05-28 06:09 UTC

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RE[3]: Memetics
by JAlexoid on Mon 28th May 2012 10:01 in reply to "RE[2]: Memetics"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Independent decision making and deduction are not yet achieved by AI; and are definitely not described by consciousness.

Though if AI acquires consciousness then it might be easier to get to independent decision making and deduction.

Reply Parent Score: 4