Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 31st May 2012 12:24 UTC
Windows "Microsoft has been furiously ripping out legacy code in Windows 8 that would have enabled third parties to bring back the Start button, Start Menu, and other software bits that could have made this new OS look and work like its predecessor. In fact, I've seen that several well-known UI hacks that worked fine with the Windows 8 Consumer Preview are no longer functional in the coming Release Preview. And those with hopes that Microsoft would allow businesses, at least, to boot directly to the desktop should prepare for disappointment. That feature not only isn't happening, it's being removed from Windows Server 12 (Windows 8's stable mate) as well." When you buy a new machine later this year, you will use Metro, an environment wholly inferior, incomplete, and not at all ready to replace the traditional desktop in any way, shape, or form. Whether you like it or not.
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Forcing Myself
by REM2000 on Thu 31st May 2012 13:15 UTC
REM2000
Member since:
2006-07-25

Being in the IT world its something im going to force myself to use, i have a laptop ready, im going to bung on the Release Preview and use it for a month to see the in's and outs. I don't expect to come out the other end smiling but im not going to be rigid about it either as i want to get an understanding and a proper personal opinion of it.

One thing i don't like is the argument that if you don't like Metro you don't like change, it's nonsense, i switched from Windows to a Mac as my primary home environment, it was different but i adapted, however where i think the argument is nonsense is the millions of people happily using various smart phones, if they couldn't adapt to change then the smart phones would all be running PocketPC. I think for the majority and myself included we welcome change when it brings benefits. Personally from the previews ive used so far im not convinced and feel that my productivity is going to go down using Windows 8. I feel that a full screen start menu is rather jaring and completely not needed, im sure they could have come up with a compromise and shifted further with Windows 9.

From what ive used, the start menu gets incredibly cluttered very quickly when installing my apps as loads of readme files etc.. are added, Visual Studio and Delphi completely devistate the start menu and requires me to go through and unpin loads of apps that i dont use but take up quite a bit of screen estate.

The part which annoys me the most is that UI aside this looks to be one of the best versions of Windows yet, the underhood changes are incredibly good. The storage pools, disconnect/sleep resume copying, the new copy dialogs and limiters, hyper-v in the client, i could go on and on, i would like to dump the ui of Win7 on top of the Win8 base as personally i think that Windows 7 has one of the best Windows UI's to date, im very productive, it looks clean/good and doesn't get in the way of me getting work done.

Sorry for the long rant, but after the excellent release of Windows 7, i had really high hopes under steve sinofsky that Windows was having a second renaissance.

Reply Score: 10

RE: Forcing Myself
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 31st May 2012 13:20 in reply to "Forcing Myself"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Being in the IT world its something im going to force myself to use, i have a laptop ready, im going to bung on the Release Preview and use it for a month to see the in's and outs. I don't expect to come out the other end smiling but im not going to be rigid about it either as i want to get an understanding and a proper personal opinion of it.


Ditto. I actually really like Metro - just not when I have to do real work (80% of my computer time). That is all.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Forcing Myself
by ebasconp on Thu 31st May 2012 15:35 in reply to "RE: Forcing Myself"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

Agreed, I like the Metro interface and I find all technology MS is implementing behind the scenes to support it just fascinating, but sadly, Windows 8 turns your computer into a glorified iPad.

Dunno if win8 will be accepted or not by the community, but my guess is that people will move their eyes to more mature technologies (Mountain Lion comes to my mind: They also are merging their tablet technology with their desktop OS, but the resulting OS seems to be more mature and "pro").

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Forcing Myself
by Tuishimi on Thu 31st May 2012 16:54 in reply to "Forcing Myself"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Fair comment. I have found that once I adapted to using my windows key and the start screen it was business as usual. In fact I have come to like the start screen... I have everything arranged the way I like it and can find my primary/secondary apps quickly, visually.

I really can't see going back to a start menu button at this point. It has all become second nature to me.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Forcing Myself
by WereCatf on Thu 31st May 2012 17:12 in reply to "RE: Forcing Myself"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Fair comment. I have found that once I adapted to using my windows key and the start screen it was business as usual. In fact I have come to like the start screen... I have everything arranged the way I like it and can find my primary/secondary apps quickly, visually.

I really can't see going back to a start menu button at this point. It has all become second nature to me.


I could use Windows 8 and its new, but I wouldn't be getting any actual benefit from using it.

For one I do not have any use whatsoever for small tiles with miniscule amounts of content which I cannot even modify but which still consume more space than simple icons and which serve as visual distractions.

Secondly, I simply juggle between a whole bunch of open windows constantly and often I have to see 4 windows simultaneously, ie. Metro simply wouldn't work at all for my needs.

Thirdly, as long as I can just pin all my most-used apps on the taskbar I wouldn't even see the Start-screen most of the time. But when I need something that isn't pinned it's much faster and less visually-and-conceptionally jarring to just pick it from a menu that covers barely 1/5th of the screen than from a screen that takes over the whole desktop.

That's mostly the issue I see: there is no gain in using the new screen. If there is no gain why can't I be allowed to skip it altogether?

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Forcing Myself
by Dave_K on Thu 31st May 2012 20:48 in reply to "RE: Forcing Myself"
Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

I think Metro's Start Screen makes a pretty nifty Start Menu replacement. What worries me about Metro is that Microsoft clearly intend it to be much more than a fancy app launcher and optional tablet interface.

For now it'll be easy to ignore Metro apps, but that won't necessarily be true in a few years time. Even if major productivity applications stick with the traditional desktop, I can see things like small utilities, media players and document viewers moving to Metro.

Reply Parent Score: 3