Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 31st May 2012 11:11 UTC
Fedora Core "Fedora 18 will be released at around the same time as Windows 8, and as previously discussed all Windows 8 hardware will be shipping with secure boot enabled by default. [...] We've been working on a plan for dealing with this. It's not ideal, but of all the approaches we've examined we feel that this one offers the best balance between letting users install Fedora while still permitting user freedom." Wait for it... "Our first stage bootloader will be signed with a Microsoft key."
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RE[4]: Wonderful...
by Neolander on Fri 1st Jun 2012 19:52 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Wonderful..."
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

I'm just looking forward to operating systems that make use of safer systems programming languages, where buffer exploits are a thing of the past. Or at least with micro architectures with good security models around each process.

You are not alone. Microkernels and VM-based OSs are two example of common OS designs that go in that direction, Singularity being an example of the latter and Genode, QNX, MINIX and my pet project being examples of the formers.

Sadly, these will never go very far unless the major OSs decide to do a step in the right direction themselves. In a way, I think that Android is the best thing that has happened to OS security recently, in that it is the first mainstream OS that actually tries a novel approach to solving security problems instead of hiding them behind the closed doors of a vetting process. Implementation sucks, though.

Unfortunately, this means more security over all the applications do, and can have bad side effects in the hands of not so nice corporations.

Totally true. The problem is that all too often, corporations use security as an excuse to get more control on their users. Whereas the goal of a proper security system, to the contrary, would be to help users deal with trust issues in an informed and efficient way.

Edited 2012-06-01 19:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Wonderful...
by moondevil on Sat 2nd Jun 2012 12:53 in reply to "RE[4]: Wonderful..."
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Sadly, these will never go very far unless the major OSs decide to do a step in the right direction themselves.


This is the main issue. No alternative OS architecture, or systems programming language, will ever take off, if no one from the major OS vendors picks them up.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Wonderful...
by ilovebeer on Sat 2nd Jun 2012 15:47 in reply to "RE[5]: Wonderful..."
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Sadly, these will never go very far unless the major OSs decide to do a step in the right direction themselves.

This is the main issue. No alternative OS architecture, or systems programming language, will ever take off, if no one from the major OS vendors picks them up.

I don't believe that to be true. An OS and/or programming languages don't require major vendor support, they require user & developer support. Of course help from the big guys can be a tremendous help & benefit, but their participation isn't a requirement for success.

Reply Parent Score: 2