Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 3rd Jun 2012 22:04 UTC
Windows So, I've been using the Windows 8 Release Preview since it came out, almost exclusively (except for work, since I'm obviously not going to rely on unfinished and untested software for that). I already knew I could get into Metro on my 11.6" ZenBook, but on my 24" desktop, things aren't looking as rosy. Here's an illustrated guide of the most pressing issues I run into, and five suggestions to address them. Instead of just complaining, let's get constructive.
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RE[2]: Unaddressed
by Nelson on Mon 4th Jun 2012 07:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Unaddressed"
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

Just like Vista was going to herald the beginning of the end of Microsoft..dream on.

If Microsoft can break their dependency on slow moving businesses, then that's a proposition which would likely look very attractive to them. The key isn't to see where things are now, but where things are going.

Mobile growth is exploding, the form factors people use are changing, and the use cases around the devices are changing.

Microsoft makes 30% off of any paid app in the app store, that's up from 0% currently under Windows 7. The money is obviously in their consumer market.

Doesn't open up any opportunity for Linux particularly, because they have their own shit they need to get together, plus there's always Windows 7.

At least until Windows 9 comes, Microsoft has more breathing room, and is able to refine what is Windows 8 to fit businesses a little more naturally. By then I speculate that WinRT will be mature enough to fully replace Win32.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Unaddressed
by adkilla on Mon 4th Jun 2012 08:13 in reply to "RE[2]: Unaddressed"
adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

Just like Vista was going to herald the beginning of the end of Microsoft..dream on.


Vista did not shove a new restrictive usability paradigm down on users. The negative reaction to Vista was due to performance, compatibility and under the hood changes. Windows 8 is a totally different kettle of fish.

At least until Windows 9 comes, Microsoft has more breathing room, and is able to refine what is Windows 8 to fit businesses a little more naturally. By then I speculate that WinRT will be mature enough to fully replace Win32.


You mean like how .Net has replaced Win32?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Unaddressed
by Nelson on Mon 4th Jun 2012 08:25 in reply to "RE[3]: Unaddressed"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


Vista did not shove a new restrictive usability paradigm down on users. The negative reaction to Vista was due to performance, compatibility and under the hood changes. Windows 8 is a totally different kettle of fish.


Oh sure. Vista's DRM was going to herald the end of computing. It was going to take your first born and lock him away in a dungeon.

Aero Glass was never going to be liked, I can't believe they're actually using the graphics card!

Oh, want some more hilarity? People complained they couldn't get the Classic Style start menu in Windows 7.

Fast forward to today, people bitch about Aero going away and the Start Menu (The same one they bitched about a version ago) going away.

Some people are so unbelievably fickle it amazes me.


You mean like how .Net has replaced Win32?


.NET birthed XAML, which is now a core part of the Windows Division. And C# (which runs ontop of .NET) is a first class WinRT citizen.

The WinRT APIs (and the WinRT additions to COM most notably inheritance using IInspectable and aggregation) are clearly inspired by .NET .

C++/CX includes things like Generics, Interfaces, and Partial Classes which come straight from C# .

Oh, and that WinRT thing, the entire bedrock of Windows 8? The metadata format comes directly from .NET . You can use .NET dissasemblers to inspect the WinRT APIs.

So yes, .NET has had a hand in replacing Win32. Of course, over a decade and a half some details change, but the influence is still there.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Unaddressed
by hoak on Mon 4th Jun 2012 08:47 in reply to "RE[2]: Unaddressed"
hoak Member since:
2007-12-17

Nelson you need to learn to do a little market research as to where Microsoft makes it's bread and butter, always has, and where it never has... The 'Mobile Market' is an abject fad of consumption toys for idiots that don't really know how to use computers for productive work...

That's well and fine and it may make money, but the people that actually make those toys and the toy software for them need an OS with a multi-tasking interface to make them for you -- not to mention the people that dispatch the ambulance for the Cretins that can't play with their passive consumption toys and walk or drive at the same time...

Edited 2012-06-04 08:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Unaddressed
by Nelson on Mon 4th Jun 2012 08:58 in reply to "RE[3]: Unaddressed"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Developers are well taken care of in Windows 8. Microsoft has done a spectacular job with every aspect of the developer story.

Visual Studio 2012 knocks it out of the park. C# is improved dramatically with async/await.

XAML is fast and fluid, first class support from C# and even C++

JS/HTML5 have great tooling alongside XAML in Blend.

Developers are going to love Windows 8, and in fact, I read an article where an Android developer said its no contest, Windows 8 is hands down the better development platform.

The tooling is superior, the languages are superior, and the APIs are conducive to creating a great experience on all form factors. So what exactly is it you're worried about?

Reply Parent Score: 1