Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 8th Jun 2012 23:07 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Two weeks ago, my grandmother passed away - the last grandparent I had left. As those of you with experience in dealing with deceased family members know, the funeral is only the start; the next part is taking care of the deceased's affairs, which includes going through all their belongings to determine what to do with them. I took care of my grandmother's extensive book collection, and while doing so, I hit something that fascinated me to no end: a six-volume Christian Encyclopaedia from 1956. In it, I found something I just had to share with OSNews.
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Fergy
Member since:
2006-04-10

There's a passage in the New Testament where the character of Jesus basically says that he's wiping away all the laws and teachings of the past, and replacing them with one: "Love one another as the Lord loves you".

There is also a passage where Jesus says he didn't come to abolish any of the rules of the old testament.

You can get anything from the bible if you want to. You should view it as an interesting book that shows a lot of how people throughout the ages thought about things. You should not treat it as an encyclopedia.

Reply Parent Score: 3

3rdalbum Member since:
2008-05-26

You should view it as an interesting book that shows a lot of how people throughout the ages thought about things. You should not treat it as an encyclopedia.


I assume when you say "you", you mean "people". I wanted to clarify yet again that I'm not a Christian, and therefore treat the Bible's contents as being an order of magnitude less reliable than Wikipedia :-)

I don't remember the passage about "I haven't come to abolish the laws of the Old Testament". A bible reference would be handy for me if you have one available.

And again sorry for starting a bit of a religious discussion on OSnews.

To bring things back toward their correct topic, this encyclopedia entry has come at just the right time. I've been re-reading Steven Levy's book "Hackers", the opening part of which is set only a few years after that encyclopedia entry. In the book Hackers there is discussion about chess-playing programs, so it's really quite telling that Chess was singled-out as a very computer-solvable problem, even as some people were claiming that computers would never be able to beat adults.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Jesus said he "came not to abolish the law, but to fulfil it" (Mat5:17); in a sense the old law lead up to the new law. The purpose of the old law was to prepare the Jews for Christ, whom they rejected. No, the old law no longer _applies_ to us, because the Jews at the time had taken the law so far away from it's meaning ("you make the law a burden upon the people") by following the letters and not the meaning. Jesus did away with the law by returning it to it's spirit meaning Mat22:37-40 "...On these two commandments depend the whole Law and the Prophets"

The old testament and new testament run in parallels. The first half of the Bible is about the physical, the second half is spiritual. The first half is about what happened to provide examples, the second half is about what sort of person you should be.

Reply Parent Score: 5

skeezix Member since:
2006-02-06

Good response; I like how you framed and the issue.

From a person who tries to be a Christian but often finds himself feeling like he should be a New Jew instead -- not by desire, but by some sort of misplaced sense of obligation.

Reply Parent Score: 1

spudley99 Member since:
2009-03-25

"There's a passage in the New Testament where the character of Jesus basically says that he's wiping away all the laws and teachings of the past, and replacing them with one: "Love one another as the Lord loves you".

There is also a passage where Jesus says he didn't come to abolish any of the rules of the old testament.

You can get anything from the bible if you want to. You should view it as an interesting book that shows a lot of how people throughout the ages thought about things. You should not treat it as an encyclopedia.
"

Uh, the encyclopedia we're talking about is a separate book.

But re the passage you mention: Jesus actually says "I have not come to abolish the Law but to fulfill it." This is a very key point for Christians, and basically says what @3rdalbum said which you replied to. You got it wrong because you only quoted half of the sentence.

In these things, context is everything; most of the wacky sects and cults out there start this way by taking a quote from the bible (or wherever) out of context, and making a big thing of it.

Reply Parent Score: 2