Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 8th Jun 2012 23:07 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Two weeks ago, my grandmother passed away - the last grandparent I had left. As those of you with experience in dealing with deceased family members know, the funeral is only the start; the next part is taking care of the deceased's affairs, which includes going through all their belongings to determine what to do with them. I took care of my grandmother's extensive book collection, and while doing so, I hit something that fascinated me to no end: a six-volume Christian Encyclopaedia from 1956. In it, I found something I just had to share with OSNews.
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Religion
by twitterfire on Sat 9th Jun 2012 18:46 UTC
twitterfire
Member since:
2008-09-11

Thom, I want to offer my sincere condolences on your recent loss. However you can hardly consider someone orthodox unless he or she isn't orthodox.

Reformed is reformed. By stretching your imagination you can consider the Catholic Church as being somehow orthodox.

But as any informed man knows, only the Orthodox Church is orthodox, hence the name.

You can't be "reformed" or "protestant" and orthodox same time.

It's the same in all religions, there are orthodox christians and reformed christians, there are orthodox jews and reformed jews, there are orthodox buddhists and reformed buddhists, there are reformed muslims and orthodox muslims.

Again, I'm deeply sorry for your loss and I'm sorry to bring this issue up.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Religion
by Radio on Mon 11th Jun 2012 12:58 in reply to "Religion"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Of course you can be an "orthodox reformist". Just stick to one strain of reformism.

Or it is just one of those funny, wasted-irony examples of two antagonists concepts mixed together, like the "Institutional Revolutionary Party" of Mexico.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Religion
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 11th Jun 2012 13:01 in reply to "Religion"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Orthodox means you hold very steadfast to a set of rules and regulations and do no waiver from them, even in the light of a changing world. There's a clear difference between the Orthodox Church and an orthodox church.

Reply Parent Score: 1