Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 11th Jun 2012 00:38 UTC, submitted by judgen
Windows "Microsoft recently extended 'It Just Works' compatibility for Visual Basic 6 applications through the full lifetime of Windows 8. Visual Basic 6 first shipped in 1998, so its apps will have at least 24 years of supported lifetime. Contrast that with the Microsoft .NET Framework 1.0 (2002), which is incompatible with Windows 7 (2009)."
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RE[2]: Memories...
by Morgan on Mon 11th Jun 2012 06:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Memories..."
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

Actually my lack of programming skill stems directly from my issues with math beyond basic calculus. While I understand logic and program flow, I don't have a good enough foundation for math-heavy languages. My skills lie in language arts, mechanical and electronics engineering, and to a limited degree, music theory.

And I do own a WP7 phone, I've had an HTC Arrive since November 2011 and for the most part I love it.

I would say the only thing bad about learning VB is that it is severely limited in scope, and also allows for lazy programming. It's comparable to Legos in practice, and it hits a plateau fairly quickly. In the same vein, building an R/C car out of Lego blocks is fine but you would never get a full sized vehicle that was functional with them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Memories...
by zima on Mon 11th Jun 2012 06:38 in reply to "RE[2]: Memories..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Careful there, some Lego-heads can take it as a challenge...

Edited 2012-06-11 06:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Memories...
by dnebdal on Mon 11th Jun 2012 08:01 in reply to "RE[2]: Memories..."
dnebdal Member since:
2008-08-27

You can get quite far in the world with only a modest understanding of math. ;)

One thing I've noticed from the outside is that at higher levels, maths seems to share some of the same features as programming: You've got classes of things, transformations that can be done on them to get other types of things, properties that are (or are not) comparable, and ... I might be mistaken, but it looks like going deeper into mathematics takes you from algebra and other busywork into something that tastes vaguely like a really convoluted OO type/class system. Fascinating stuff; shame I've gotten distracted by bioinformatics instead.

Oh, and if you do ever want to play around with it again, there are a number of nice and useful languages out there. I'm fond of python, some like ruby, and on windows you might want to look at the .net family (VB.net would seem obvious, but you might want to look at C# - it's a neat language, though slightly further over on the obvious vs. compact scale.)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Memories...
by Laurence on Mon 11th Jun 2012 10:12 in reply to "RE[2]: Memories..."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Actually my lack of programming skill stems directly from my issues with math beyond basic calculus. While I understand logic and program flow, I don't have a good enough foundation for math-heavy languages. My skills lie in language arts, mechanical and electronics engineering, and to a limited degree, music theory.

And I do own a WP7 phone, I've had an HTC Arrive since November 2011 and for the most part I love it.

I would say the only thing bad about learning VB is that it is severely limited in scope, and also allows for lazy programming. It's comparable to Legos in practice, and it hits a plateau fairly quickly. In the same vein, building an R/C car out of Lego blocks is fine but you would never get a full sized vehicle that was functional with them.


People are often quick to dismiss VB6 but it actually had a lot of hidden power. I remember being taught VB6 at college and I'd written a 2D racing game in DirectX7. VB also offered the full range of Win32 API's that C++ had (all reasonably well documented too). In fact you could call pretty much any DLL so long as you knew the function name, inputs and returns.

The biggest weakness with VB6 wasn't the language itself but actually the compiler. Visual Basic was massively crippled by Microsoft's insistence to compile to P-Code with ActiveX dependencies. While I understand the managed code like VB requires some level of runtime interpretation, the objects created from VB's compiler were just terrible. But I guess back then visualised runtime environments were very much still an emerging technology.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Memories...
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 12th Jun 2012 17:59 in reply to "RE[3]: Memories..."
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

VB did not offer full win32 api support. It did not handle pointers, which limited the api's it could call. ( Ironically VB5 had a trick which did make it possible, but MS closed that loop hole in VB6).

VB didn't have to compile to P Code. Their was an option to compile to native code, which did perform better.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Memories...
by snorkel1 on Wed 13th Jun 2012 15:34 in reply to "RE[2]: Memories..."
snorkel1 Member since:
2012-02-25

"Actually my lack of programming skill stems directly from my issues with math beyond basic calculus."

You don't need to be a math whiz to program, unless your writing programs that use a lot of mathematics for say a mission to mars ha ha,otherwise for 99.9 percent of app development you certainly don't need to know any calculus, college algebra is plenty good enough and many good programmers have only high school math skills.

Reply Parent Score: 1