Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 11th Jun 2012 00:38 UTC, submitted by judgen
Windows "Microsoft recently extended 'It Just Works' compatibility for Visual Basic 6 applications through the full lifetime of Windows 8. Visual Basic 6 first shipped in 1998, so its apps will have at least 24 years of supported lifetime. Contrast that with the Microsoft .NET Framework 1.0 (2002), which is incompatible with Windows 7 (2009)."
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galvanash
Member since:
2006-01-25

Those Visual Basic applications they wrote back then for corporate environments were much more pleasant to use than the "web apps" that came afterwards.


Put 50,000 simultaneous users on a VB frontended database application and let me know how that works out for you... Then try to run it on an iPad. Or Linux.

I'm not arguing against your basic premise, just pointing out that you are comparing apples and orangutans. The "webification" of this stuff is not about making pleasant interfaces for line of business apps with 20 users all running the same machines - it is about scalability and platform/vendor independence.

VB did everything wrong if either of those things are important to you...

Reply Parent Score: 3

Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

it is about scalability and platform/vendor independence.


Not to mention maintaining it after ten years have passed and the codebase has grown to millions of lines. It's that kind of codebase that's mostly responsible for VB6's dread reputation...

Reply Parent Score: 3

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Put 50,000 simultaneous users on a VB frontended database application and let me know how that works out for you...


This has nothing to do with the VB frontends, but everything with the backend.

Web applications suffer from the same issues, with the added complexity that part of the UI is also running server side.

The "webification" of this stuff is not about making pleasant interfaces for line of business apps with 20 users all running the same machines - it is about scalability and platform/vendor independence.


User interfaces do not have anything to do with server side scalability.

As for web interfaces being pleasant. I curse every time I need to maintain a mountain of CSS/HTML/JavaScript garbage that could be easily done in a RAD tool.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

moondevil,


"This has nothing to do with the VB frontends, but everything with the backend."

Well, ActiveX, VBD's, DCOM, etc were an awful mess. They were far more painful to deploy than web applications. However your point is completely valid with respect to Local vs Web apps in general.

"Web applications suffer from the same issues, with the added complexity that part of the UI is also running server side."

Yep, "fat applications" often deliver a superior interface and consume fewer resources at the same time.



"As for web interfaces being pleasant. I curse every time I need to maintain a mountain of CSS/HTML/JavaScript garbage that could be easily done in a RAD tool."

Well, in theory a good RAD tool could encapsulate the CSS/HTML/Javascript bits on the web in the same way it encapsulates the win32s on the desktop, but in practice we have many kludges to compensate for web postbacks and needing to write interfaces in both client side and server side code.

Reply Parent Score: 2

galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

This has nothing to do with the VB frontends, but everything with the backend.


No. It has everything to do with the middleware - and VB6 doesn't have any worth speaking of. Sure, you can add some - but it is harder than just wiring things up with ADO/RDO. Obviously that isn't an option, since the whole argument against moving off the now 15 year old dead end platform is that .NET is too hard.

I hear ya though - making your app scale is the DBA's problem...

Web applications suffer from the same issues, with the added complexity that part of the UI is also running server side.


Not modern ones. There is virtually no reason to "run" UI code on the server anymore. You may host it and serve it to clients, but you certainly don't need to run anything except your data layer. It is the same thing as putting a VB6 executable on a network share, except:

1. It can work on different platforms.
2. It works over the internet.
3. It at least can work on mobile devices if you bother.
3. Pick a language you like - there are hundreds.
4. Supports virtually any database known to man.
5. Performs extremely well when done right.
6. Scales much better than monolithic desktop apps using connection oriented, archaic things like ADO/RDO/ODBC.
7. Has the largest developer community on earth.
8. Is the way Microsoft is moving anyway...

User interfaces do not have anything to do with server side scalability.


No they don't. But 15 year old database connection components do...

As for web interfaces being pleasant. I curse every time I need to maintain a mountain of CSS/HTML/JavaScript garbage that could be easily done in a RAD tool.


There are RAD tools for the web too you know... But if web frontends don't float your boat there is WPF, Silverlight, QT, GTK+, etc. etc. etc.. At least those technologies have parts that were actually written for Operating Systems newer than Windows 98...

I know I am sounding like an ass at this point. I don't care, it's frankly infuriating. I honestly cannot understand how any rationale person can defend continued use of a 15 year old product built on extinct technology on the sole basis of "it's easy"... When I was 12 I wrote TIBasic programs for my TI99/4A - compared to modern development in practically any language it was certainly easy - but it is also irrelevent now. The world has moved on. The vendor of the tool has moved on (and then some). It's time to move on.

Reply Parent Score: 3