Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 13th Jun 2012 22:21 UTC, submitted by Valhalla
Linux The BBC interviews Torvalds. I like this bit: "For me, Linux on the desktop is where I started, and Linux on the desktop is literally what I still use today primarily - although I obviously do have other Linux devices, including an Android phone - so I'd personally really love for it to take over in that market too. But I guess that in the meantime I can't really complain about the successes in other markets." Linux on the desktop is quite passe. Phones and servers is where it's at.
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RE[5]: Desktop Forever...
by galvanash on Thu 14th Jun 2012 01:17 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Desktop Forever..."
galvanash
Member since:
2006-01-25

WereCatf,

"Kickstarter is US-only."

So what? They probably don't even make up 0.1% of startup funding here in the US. The lack of venture capital may be a legitimate problem for you, but the lack of "Kickstarter"? Sheesh!


Kickstarter != Venture Capital...

Kickstarter lets the person asking for the funds decided what strings they are willing to attach to the money they receive. Those wanting to "invest" simply decide if they like the terms or not. There is no heavy handed negotiation involved. Everyone wins and no one has to sell their soul. People investing in kickstarter projects want to see the result of their investment - it is generally not about seeing a financial return.

Venture Capital firms? They generally want your first born child. Sure you can set the terms, but good luck getting them to accept them... They will almost invariably negotiate terms that heavily favor the investors in the long term. It is about long term money making potential, not genuine interest in your product or service (other than its ability to make money).

Of course there is TONS more money available through traditional channels, but kickstarter is great if you have an idea that just needs a gentle financial nudge to get going.

I'm just saying it isn't the same thing - many people who would be more than willing to do a kickstarter project would _never_ accept funding through traditional venture capital avenues.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[6]: Desktop Forever...
by Alfman on Thu 14th Jun 2012 02:10 in reply to "RE[5]: Desktop Forever..."
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

galvanash,

"Kickstarter != Venture Capital..."

Well, they clearly exist to serve the same funding role, but your right they go about it in different ways. Kickstarter is just one of many crowd funding models.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_crowd_funding_services

I wonder if any are available to WereCatf? Truth be told, since her project would require custom purpose hardware, the "All Or Nothing" model used by Kickstarter is probably not the best funding model. The wiki list includes other models such as "Keep It All" "Equity" and "Loan".

I would like to hear the experiences of anyone who's actually tried any of these!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Desktop Forever...
by WereCatf on Thu 14th Jun 2012 04:51 in reply to "RE[6]: Desktop Forever..."
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_crowd_funding_services

I wonder if any are available to WereCatf? Truth be told, since her project would require custom purpose hardware, the "All Or Nothing" model used by Kickstarter is probably not the best funding model. The wiki list includes other models such as "Keep It All" "Equity" and "Loan".


The problem with these alternatives is mostly the fact that, well, no one has heard of them. Hell, even *I* haven't heard of any of them and I'm a computer nerd. That means reaching the same kind of audience as with Kickstarter would be more-or-less impossible.

As an aside: yes, I realize what I have in mind would require me to actually set up a company, hire a patent-lawyer, some engineers and developers and thus even getting a prototype out the door would likely end up costing in the excess of 400,000 euro. Ie. there's no way anyone sane would want to finance that. Alas, one can still dream, dream of an open, multi-purpose ARM-device that's first and foremost built with end-users in mind, not profits.

Reply Parent Score: 4