Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Jun 2012 21:16 UTC
Windows This rumour has been rummaging around the web for a few days, but now that The New York Times has picked it up, it probably carries a bit more validity than it did before. Microsoft invited members of the press to a mystery event coming Monday, and supposedly, the company will launch its very own ARM tablet running Windows RT.
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Most people don't get windows 8
by LouisBarman on Sat 16th Jun 2012 09:37 UTC
LouisBarman
Member since:
2010-06-06

Most people I speak to just don't get what Windows 8 is all about.

Fundamentally a tablet is no different from a desktop/laptop once you add a _decent_ keyboard and mouse. This is best explained in terms of the iPad 3 (OK I know -- it's called the "new iPad"). So suppose a user WANTS to run Photoshop or Excel or a full IDE on an iPad 3 like device. All they need to do is add a _decent_ keyboard and mouse, they already have a very good screen with more pixels than most desktops.

You try to explain this to Apple fan boys and they just stair at you blankly and say something like "why on earth would you want to do that? You know that tablets and laptops are fundimentally different". But why pay/carry two device's when the tablet could easily be transformed into a full desktop experience just by adding a keyboard and mouse. There are also massive battery gains for an arm based laptop.

Provided windows 8 experience is not totally crippled on the desktop I expect in the long term that this combined desktop/tablet experience to be windows 8 killer feature.

Reply Score: 3

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

So suppose a user WANTS to run Photoshop or Excel or a full IDE on an iPad 3 like device. All they need to do is add a _decent_ keyboard and mouse, they already have a very good screen with more pixels than most desktops.


That would require an x86 tablet/laptop hybrid. Those don't exist.

Even if they did exist that still isn't a good reason to compromise desktop productivity. It would make more sense to have the hybrid detect when it is in tablet mode and then change the interface, not force a semi-tablet interface when it is in desktop mode.

People get that Windows 8 sucks. It doesn't provide anything for them.

There are also massive battery gains for an arm based laptop.


I get around 7 hours with my Core i5 laptop. For ARM laptops the battery gain isn't worth the loss of compatibility. Programs like Photoshop and iTunes can't be converted overnight and companies like Adobe won't care about porting to such a small market.

Edited 2012-06-16 14:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Johann Chua Member since:
2005-07-22

Why would you run iTunes on a tablet?

Reply Parent Score: 2

ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

Yes, they do exist. I have one and it's called the Acer Iconia Tab W500. It runs Windows and Android x86 just fine, with or without the keyboard dock.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


That would require an x86 tablet/laptop hybrid. Those don't exist.


Yes they do? Samsung Series 7 Tablet comes with Bluetooth. All you need is a BT KB and Mouse. Its still Windows, your peripherals work.

That's plenty hybrid for my workflows.


Even if they did exist that still isn't a good reason to compromise desktop productivity. It would make more sense to have the hybrid detect when it is in tablet mode and then change the interface, not force a semi-tablet interface when it is in desktop mode.


It's called WinKey+D to go to the Desktop. All my apps work (yes, including your stupid iTunes red herring)


People get that Windows 8 sucks. It doesn't provide anything for them.


I'm glad you know what "People get", you should really be a pollster, since you know everything about everybody. You must be about the greatest spokesman for bullshit I've ever seen.

I get around 7 hours with my Core i5 laptop. For ARM laptops the battery gain isn't worth the loss of compatibility.


Agreed. I find x86 Windows 8 machines a much more attractive proposition. Especially if Intel can get power consumption down (Which I have no doubt they can). Another cool thing is that Windows 8 devices much meet temp requirements, so no, the damn thing can't burn a hole in your lap anymore.

Programs like Photoshop and iTunes can't be converted overnight and companies like Adobe won't care about porting to such a small market.


Programs like Photoshop and iTunes can't be ported to Windows RT period. They either go full on Metro with a rewrite, or they don't get to play ball. I'd prefer if iTunes didn't play ball, personally.

Its Windows. It sells by virtue of being Windows.

Edited 2012-06-17 19:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

Fundamentally a tablet is no different from a desktop/laptop once you add a _decent_ keyboard and mouse. This is best explained in terms of the iPad 3 (OK I know -- it's called the "new iPad"). So suppose a user WANTS to run Photoshop or Excel or a full IDE on an iPad 3 like device. All they need to do is add a _decent_ keyboard and mouse, they already have a very good screen with more pixels than most desktops.


That would be cool if it wasn't because window management is pretty much non existant on tablets, so it would only work if you are using your computer as an appliance where you are booting to run one single app.

And that's exactly why people complain about Metro (besides looking like a web page with missing CSS): it's bringing all the limitations of window management from tablets to the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

Well, I'd guess that 90% of users hate "window management", which is why they run their apps maximized. For those that need multiple windows running, W8 still has the desktop. What I see is that the sefl-proclaimed "power users" can't accept the fact that they are in the severe minority of users, and they're pissed that Microsoft is going to cater to the 90% now, rather than the 10%. Those folks need to get over it, and need to get over themselves while they're at it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

quackalist Member since:
2007-08-27

Could have fooled me...anyone with an ounce gets it. They just don't want it or have any use for it. If I could turn it off, not fussed if anyone else wants metro, and just use the next service pack for 7 [Vista] I wouldn't mind.

Not used one myself but I saw someone with a windows phone today....metro seemed to make sense with that and on a tablet it probably does too, though it all seems like an attempt to lock-down and monetise.

Isn't it about time MS actually did something radical with Windows instead of releasing service packs (no, metro isn't radical...perverse, perhaps).

Edited 2012-06-17 02:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

kristoph Member since:
2006-01-01

The thing is, if you add a decent keyboard and mouse/trackpad to an iPad you have a laptop.

And if you need a decent keyboard and mouse/trackpad on a daily basis then an iPad is a consumption device for you.

If you only need to write an occasional email, letter, tweak some picture, maybe do a drawing, then an iPad is all you need and the keyboard is unnecessary (even if it's still helpful occasionally).

Reply Parent Score: 2