Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 16th Jun 2012 17:52 UTC
Windows Adrian Kingsley-Hughes pens a rant on Windows 8, calling it 'awful': "I'm now ready to sum up my Windows 8 experience with a single word: awful. I could have chosen a number of other words - terrible, horrible, painful and execrable all spring to mind - but it doesn't matter, the sentiment is the same." I've been using Windows 8 Release Preview on both my ZenBook and my regular desktop since its release, and here's my short review: "I like it." Issues a-plenty, but for what is essentially a 1.0 release - not bad. It's a hell of a lot better than other releases which were similar in scope (Mac OS X 10.0, KDE 4.0).
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Not for business use.
by Windows Sucks on Sat 16th Jun 2012 22:00 UTC
Windows Sucks
Member since:
2005-11-10

My main problem is that the Metro UI on my laptop feels like I am using an iPad on my laptop. I don't like the one off App feel I get with it. That sucks bad enough on my tablet and my phone, but to have that on a full computer is silly. Apples approach to take the best features from the iPad and iPhone but leaving the UI mostly the same seems much smarter.

Also all the products that Microsoft has used the metro style UI on have failed. The Zune? Windows Phone? I am not sure why they really think this will be something I want to see everyday when I am working.

Live tiles etc are cool for a tablet, or a phone but in a business setting they are useless, most of the apps that use live tiles will be taken out when the OS is locked down with GPO's etc in a secure office network.

I think that they should of toned down the Windows 7 interface (Getting rid of Areo) like they do in the Windows 8 classic desktop, added in Metro as a option and go from there.

People compare the Windows 8 changes to Mac OS 10. But remember when Apple did this the Mac was a blip on the user radar, they didn't have a billion users to deal with and the change actually made the Mac OS way more popular to the regular user. Ms waits till their most popular version of Windows ever, the comeback from Vista and then again throws everything into a total tail spin? Gutsy I must say. Or maybe a little crazy.

I will say I think Windows 7 will be around for a VERY, VERY long time. Especially since VB 6 is still the most popular development environment for Windows.

Only thing saving Microsoft is they have no comp on the desktop front.

Reply Score: 7

RE: Not for business use.
by nt_jerkface on Sun 17th Jun 2012 00:24 in reply to "Not for business use. "
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

The funny thing is that a lot of us like metro in WP7. I went with WP7 over Android because of metro.

But in Windows 8 it is being shoved down your throat and disrupting workflow. Windows 8 gives metro a bad name.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Not for business use.
by MollyC on Sun 17th Jun 2012 01:29 in reply to "Not for business use. "
MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

Also all the products that Microsoft has used the metro style UI on have failed. The Zune? Windows Phone?


I like how you say "all", implying many, then name just two items. And Zune failed because of Metro? You REALLY believe that?

BTW, Xbox is a great success, and it uses Metro.
And Windows Phone usage is steadily increasing, so you might be premature in celbrating its "failure" just yet.

Normally I ignore your posts, since your very user name screams "I'm a troll", but I made an exception in this case.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Not for business use.
by anevilyak on Sun 17th Jun 2012 01:35 in reply to "RE: Not for business use. "
anevilyak Member since:
2005-09-14

W, Xbox is a great success, and it uses Metro.


Minor nitpick, but the 360 was a success long before the quite recent retooling of its UI to make use of Metro, so it seems a bit disingenuous to use it as an example here.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Not for business use.
by Morgan on Mon 18th Jun 2012 02:22 in reply to "RE: Not for business use. "
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

MollyC, you and I tend to disagree quite a lot but on this point, I'm right there with you.

The Zune didn't "fail", it was phased out in favor of Windows Phone devices which happen to also be Zune players*. My sister has one of the last Zune devices made, and she absolutely loves my phone because of the similar UI. I also greatly prefer the Zune devices to classic iPods, and find it comparable to the iPod touch as a media player.

Windows Phone is here to stay in my opinion, as long as Nokia doesn't screw it up. I think that's the only real danger the platform might run into; that company has gone batshit crazy. The OS itself is simply stunning. It needs maybe one or two tweaks to be a workflow-centric dream. That's far better than iOS and Android are at this point; using iOS for more than one task at a time is an exercise in futility and opening too many apps on an Android device causes instability and lost work. Nearly a year of fighting it on three phones and a Nook taught me that, though it ran better by far on the tablet than the phones.

And I certainly am enjoying Metro on the Xbox too! In fact I'd say the ONLY thing I don't like Metro on is non-touchscreen desktop and laptop computers.

*A quote for those who don't believe me:

Here’s what you should know – ALL consumer electronics products have a lifespan, and the Zune HD is 18mo old. We were completely frank about this year’s Zune hardware being the WP7 phones, and we continue to both sell and fully support the Zune HD line of products. And as I’ve promised – we continue to bring new apps and games to the platform.
-- Dave McLauchlan, Senior Business Development Manager for Zune

Source: http://anythingbutipod.com/2011/03/zune-is-not-dead/

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Not for business use.
by zima on Sat 23rd Jun 2012 23:59 in reply to "Not for business use. "
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

But remember when Apple did this the Mac was a blip on the user radar, they didn't have a billion users to deal with and the change actually made the Mac OS way more popular to the regular user

Mac is still a blip on the radar - just not in few atypical places (where it was similarly sort-of-popular already back then). Look at global Statcounter percentages... (even better: while filtering out Canada, US, Autralia, NZ, and few EU countries)

Ms waits till their most popular version of Windows ever, the comeback from Vista

That "most popular version of Windows" is just VistaSE... people might yet praise Win9, even if it'll be just Win8SE/Metro 2.0.

Edited 2012-06-23 23:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2