Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 16th Jun 2012 17:52 UTC
Windows Adrian Kingsley-Hughes pens a rant on Windows 8, calling it 'awful': "I'm now ready to sum up my Windows 8 experience with a single word: awful. I could have chosen a number of other words - terrible, horrible, painful and execrable all spring to mind - but it doesn't matter, the sentiment is the same." I've been using Windows 8 Release Preview on both my ZenBook and my regular desktop since its release, and here's my short review: "I like it." Issues a-plenty, but for what is essentially a 1.0 release - not bad. It's a hell of a lot better than other releases which were similar in scope (Mac OS X 10.0, KDE 4.0).
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tomchr
Member since:
2009-02-01

Unfortunately, Microsoft raised the requirements for Windows 8 Release Preview. Older CPUs such as Pentium Ms are no longer supported, since they don't have "Physical Address Extension" and "Execute Disable Bit". You would think that these abilities largely only concerned the 64-bit version, but no. Idiotically, this includes the 32-bit version as well, instead of being optional.

Guess, Windows 8 just isn't "allowed" to run on old hardware anymore.

Reply Score: 3

anevilyak Member since:
2005-09-14

You would think that these abilities largely only concerned the 64-bit version, but no. Idiotically, this includes the 32-bit version as well, instead of being optional.


Requiring NX nowadays actually makes sense regardless of 32 vs 64bit, since it allows one to mitigate quite a few common exploit attack vectors. Given that NX is only available in the PAE format page table, the latter is implicitly required. Furthermore, considering that those features started appearing in x86 CPUs ~8 years ago, and x86-64 even before that, I don't see the requirement as being unreasonable.

Edited 2012-06-17 01:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

I don't think you understand what PAE is if you think it makes sense on a 64bit machine.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

Guess, Windows 8 just isn't "allowed" to run on old hardware anymore.


To be fair, many recent Linux distributions won't work (at least without tweaking) on a pre-2005 Pentium M either.

For example, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 is the newest version that'll run on my trusty 2Ghz Pentium M Thinkpad (7 years old and still going strong). RHEL 6 and recent desktop distributions like Ubuntu 12.04 won't install on it at all.

Windows 7 works fine, and surprisingly even has drivers for all the outdated hardware. I can't say I'm either surprised or upset that I won't be able to run Windows 8 on it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

Good. Having too lax requirements is what hurt Vista more thatn anything else.

Reply Parent Score: 2

tomchr Member since:
2009-02-01

Good. Having too lax requirements is what hurt Vista more that anything else.


Too lax requirements wasn't what hurt Vista. It was that there was no aparrent or perceived benefits from upgrading from XP to Vista. What you were perfectly able to accomplish on XP, suddenly required a hardware upgrade to run adequately under Vista.

PAE & NX/XD under 32-bit Windows 8 should have been optional, since you're not addressing more than max. 4GB anyway + backward compatibility.

Edited 2012-06-18 18:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Thank Intel for that, their efforts with artificial segmentation - PAE was generally introduced with Pentium Pro.

And NX makes many security features much more straightforward or practical; or at least, avoids bloating the code (and a crucial part of it, security-wise). Also, forced PAE might finally lift that 4 GiB limit in consumer 32bit Windows; that's generally one of its points.

Anyway, while non-trivial numbers of people certainly keep & use such old machines, a minuscule portion of them cares about major OS upgrades.

Reply Parent Score: 2