Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 19th Jun 2012 00:10 UTC
Windows So, the Microsoft announcement - taking place as I write this, 01:45 in my timezone - turns out to be a bigger deal than expected. Microsoft just announced it's going full-on hardware - the company announced a new tablet called 'Surface', and boy, is this thing something to behold. Microsoft's hardware partners? They're not happy right now. Update: Here's Microsoft's official Surface site. I believe someone coined the phrase 'sexy as a succubus' in the comments about Vizio? Stealin' it! Update II: They aren't just taking the iPad head-on - this is a straight-up MacBook Air competitor.
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RE: About Damn Time
by Radio on Tue 19th Jun 2012 08:50 UTC in reply to "About Damn Time"
Radio
Member since:
2009-06-20

MS has been creating reference designs and new technologies for OEMs to integrate into their systems. They've tried to get them to be creative. This move is way overdue, and, for me, very much welcome.

There is a world of difference between making a nice shiny prototype and making the same thing on an industrial scale at an acceptable price point and without too many returns. Do you know how much do the awesome computers you see on display in conferences and trade shows cost? 10.000 $.

Don't believe me?

I was surprised to find fairly polished Windows 8 tablets at Computex, and it turns out I was right to be surprised. Everyone worked overtime to get devices ready by Computex, in most cases resorting hand building prototypes to the tune of $10K a piece.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5968/acers-iconia-w700-tablet-windows...

I don't know for you, but dividing the price of a product by ten (while increasing production, keeping quality high, and starting new products) is not small job. Try to work in manufacturing for once. MS poured tons of money in this, spent hours and $ making tons of prototypes, and the tablet crashed during the demo - and they have neither a price nor a shipping date.

Edited 2012-06-19 08:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: About Damn Time
by Nelson on Tue 19th Jun 2012 09:42 in reply to "RE: About Damn Time"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

That's nice conjecture, but the fact that this will be a shipping product seems to fly in the face of that defense. Obviously, the Surface Tablet has the potential to be mass produced, else it wouldnt be being sold to the masses.

What does Microsoft have that other OEMs dont? Besides drive? I mean, perhaps some of the OEM stuff is defensible to a small degree, but there is absolutely zero, none, ziltch justification for the utter GARBAGE they routinely spew out.

If you're going to come with the "its too hard excuse" then get out of the OEM business.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: About Damn Time
by JAlexoid on Tue 19th Jun 2012 12:52 in reply to "RE[2]: About Damn Time"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

That's nice conjecture, but the fact that this will be a shipping product seems to fly in the face of that defense.

Sorry, it will be a fact when it will actually be a fact. The only facts here are Microsoft's gorgeous design and their statements.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: About Damn Time
by Radio on Tue 19th Jun 2012 13:13 in reply to "RE[2]: About Damn Time"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

You may already have forgotten, but before the Surface Tablet, Microsoft created the Surface Table. Remember the price?

10.000$.

And don't begin to tell me "it's bigger so it's normal to be so expensive". Miniaturization is expensive.

What does Microsoft have that other OEMs dont?
Billions of dollars of cash from years of a successful monopoly in business and consumer software?

Since when does Apple pull out ultra-sleek monobloc devices made of glass and alloys? Since they got successfull with the iPod and iTunes and got enough money to overstep competition, pay upfront for whole factories, hundreds of machining machines, tons of rare materials. The OEM are all clinging to razor-thin margins - the result of competition. Disruption is coming from outside of the OEM battlefield, from players armored with tons of cash (earned elsewhere) ready to be poured and lost. If the surface tablet fails, the impact on MS margins will be negligible. What OEM can say that?

Reply Parent Score: 0