Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 20th Jun 2012 00:40 UTC, submitted by rohan_p
Amiga & AROS "Icaros Desktop is an effort to build a modern Amiga-compatible operating system for standard x86 hardware. It's a distribution built atop AROS, which is an open source effort to create a system compatible at the API level with the AmigaOS 3.x series. I recently had a chat to the creator of Icaros, Paolo Besser, about the creation of the OS and why Amiga continues to inspire people today."
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RE[11]: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 12:50 UTC in reply to "RE[10]: Hmmm"
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

I think the difference in our experiences is that you live in a place where things were very different than they were here.

Here every C64 user had a disk drive. Early adopters didn't have one at first, but after a while everyone had at least one, because it was the natural thing to do. Just like an extra disk drive, which everybody Sauron and I knew had. Just like the 512 kB upgrade as more and more games demanded 1 MB of RAM.

For doing serious stuff, copying disks and multi-disk games an extra disk drive made a lot of difference. If you didn't you would often get in to a situation where the Amiga would ask you to swap disks multiple times before something happened.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[12]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 13:22 in reply to "RE[11]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Still, you should at least also acknowledge such places, non-trivial numerically and with many differences, before making broad definite statements (like those implying everybody had 2nd drive or memory expansion)

Overall, really, it was fine; discotheque being acceptably rare (plus, seriously, "copying game disks or making a database of their games collection" serious stuff? ;p ).

You might be also not entirely correct about 1541... From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_Datasette

In most parts of Europe, the Datasette was the medium of choice for several years after its launch, although floppy disk drives were generally available. In the United States, however, disk drives quickly became standard, despite the Commodore 1541 floppy drive costing roughly 5 times as much as a Datasette. [...] These programs were only widely used in Europe, as the US market had long since moved onto disks.

Yes, that is "just" Wiki - well, still, one of data points and presumably expressing the view of C64 enthusiasts.
Also, I remember some other source discussing in more definite terms the dominance of cassettes in Europe (though perhaps it also included the Spectrum, and former Soviet Union)

Plus, I believe there was some long-running Netherlands-originating (but spreading also to Germany for example) radio show, transmitting games and programs for 8bit micros? (so for cassettes obviously, implying their wide popularity at the very least beside 1541; like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventilator_202#Broadcasting_Computer_S... )
Do you recall something like that / remember the name?

Edited 2012-06-20 13:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[13]: Hmmm
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Jun 2012 13:39 in reply to "RE[12]: Hmmm"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Still, you should at least also acknowledge such places, non-trivial numerically and with many differences, if you make broad definite statements (like those implying everybody had 2nd drive or memory expansion)


Everybody had them, expect people living in trivial places.


Overall, really, it was fine; discotheque being acceptably rare (plus, seriously, "copying game disks or making a database of their games collection" serious stuff? ;p ).


It's hardly stuff you'd do just for fun!


You might be also not entirely correct about 1541... From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_Datasette
"In most parts of Europe, the Datasette was the medium of choice for several years after its launch, although floppy disk drives were generally available. In the United States, however, disk drives quickly became standard, despite the Commodore 1541 floppy drive costing roughly 5 times as much as a Datasette.

Yes, that is "just" Wiki - well, still, one of data points and presumably expressing the view of C64 enthusiasts.
"

In The Netherlands people moved to disk drives, so my guess would be that so did that Germans as they were positively active in the home computer scene.


Plus, I believe there was some long-running Netherlands-originating (but spreading also to Germany for example) radio show, transmitting games and programs for 8bit micros? (so for cassettes obviously, implying their wide popularity at the very least beside 1541; like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventilator_202#Broadcasting_Computer_S... )
Do you recall something like that / remember the name?



Interestingly I talked to someone on Monday about this. We did have this radio show about computers and stuff that "broadcast" software. I never did record any software, I didn't even listen to this program.

It depends who was the intended public. ZX Spectrum users were more likely to use cassettes than C64 ones. Amiga or Atari ST users couldn't even load from tape. The Phillips P2000 used micro cassettes. We also had a number of MSX users.

Also, you couldn't record these software broadcasts on anything else but tape so it doesn't say anything about the number of tape/disk users. Then it depends on why they did this. Because it was fun, new, cool? I doubt they did it because large masses were screaming for it. I for one didn't know anyone who actually made use of this. People talked about it though.

Reply Parent Score: 2