Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 20th Jun 2012 00:40 UTC, submitted by rohan_p
Amiga & AROS "Icaros Desktop is an effort to build a modern Amiga-compatible operating system for standard x86 hardware. It's a distribution built atop AROS, which is an open source effort to create a system compatible at the API level with the AmigaOS 3.x series. I recently had a chat to the creator of Icaros, Paolo Besser, about the creation of the OS and why Amiga continues to inspire people today."
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RE[6]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 13:04 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Hmmm"
zima
Member since:
2005-07-06

That's also with them available separately - I just glanced on my local "ebay" and there are only three drives, four memory expansions, for 30+ Amigas (2 expanded, none with 2nd drive). Why such large discrepancies? (OK, we can presume than in more affluent places this was perhaps half, but the implied ~all? ...and even if, the less affluent places offset this by themselves)

But yeah, hard to tell anything about many such aspects of the past. I can say that Amiga lived here much longer - PCs are a thing of Win98 and Celerons, onwards.
And also that I was never into games meant for computer's satisfaction ;) (but seriously, many inexpensive joysticks were just fragile; and perhaps the concept was flawed - joypads are a marked improvement, me thinks; perhaps they even make those old games better, under emus)

Edited 2012-06-20 13:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Hmmm
by Laurence on Wed 20th Jun 2012 17:04 in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

That's also with them available separately - I just glanced on my local "ebay" and there are only three drives, four memory expansions, for 30+ Amigas (2 expanded, none with 2nd drive). Why such large discrepancies? (OK, we can presume than in more affluent places this was perhaps half, but the implied ~all? ...and even if, the less affluent places offset this by themselves)

Using those figures, you could also draw the conclusion that people who are willing to spend money buying addons and accessories for their Amigas are more likely to have an emotional attachment to their computer and thus less likely to sell it. Where as people who couldn't justify the upgrade costs are more likely to sell it once it becomes obsolete.

My point is this: your statistics are interesting, but meaningless. So using them as evidence or trying to draw correlations to prove a point will inevitably produce flawed results.

So while I appreciate that you're trying to substantiate your anecdotal evidence, ebay is not right place to source your figures. Better statistics would be sales figures from the era.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Hmmm
by zima on Wed 20th Jun 2012 17:52 in reply to "RE[7]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Yes, but the point is the same applies even more to personal anecdotes ;)
(for example, some people here being more "into" their Amigas back in the day, hanging out & in closer contact mostly with like-minded people, or in atypical neighbourhoods)

There must be something better we can base conclusions on; auction sites, a relatively large concentrations of surplus Amiga equipment, do seem a bit better (meaningless is too strong word, unless you're willing to argue it even more against "everybody I knew had upgrades")

And anyway, most "indifferent owner" Amigas are possibly at best forgotten in attics, cellars, or garages...

But, yeah, sales figures - unfortunately, IIRC, various Commodore country branches barely kept those about their computers (in few stats I've seen, it was about "probable ranges" more or less), much less accessories...

Edited 2012-06-20 18:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2