Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Jun 2012 11:17 UTC
Google While I sometimes see Dutch as an endangered language, reality is that with nearly 30 million speakers worldwide, we're actually doing pretty well. Sadly, this can't be said for the 3000 truly endangered languages of the world - nearly half of the world's total number of languages is on the verge of extinction, and with it, large amounts of human culture are in danger of disappearing forever. In collaboration with several universities and language institutions, Google has launched the Endangered Languages Project to document these languages - textually, visually, and auditorially.
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RE[2]: Darn!
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 21st Jun 2012 14:20 UTC in reply to "RE: Darn!"
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

If you are working with other people who work with COBOL, it helps to have a working knowledge. I feel like every language has its own good features and bad that give me a broader idea of what's possible in a language. My university mostly taught Ada, and as a result many CS students were completely ignorant of very common features in other more common languages and their use of those languages suffered as a result.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Darn!
by Andre on Thu 21st Jun 2012 16:00 in reply to "RE[2]: Darn!"
Andre Member since:
2005-07-06

One of my teachers mentioned many COBOL programmers are retiring, and there are many systems in banks and insurance companies etc. still running software written in COBOL. Therefore learning COBOL might be interesting. But on the other hand, that's not the industry I wish to find a job in.

I have never looking into Ada, I have no idea what that language is like.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Darn!
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 21st Jun 2012 16:53 in reply to "RE[3]: Darn!"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Ada is one of those design by committee languages like COBOL, only worse because it was the US Government that did it. Its designed to be a highly reliable systems language. For decades, the Airplane control systems in the US were written in Ada. If you are familiar with Pascal, its very close.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_%28programming_language%29

The version we used at school didn't have dynamic input support. So command line programs written by students were often worded strangely like:

Please enter your name, padding it with spaces to 20 characters.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Darn!
by kwan_e on Fri 22nd Jun 2012 01:27 in reply to "RE[3]: Darn!"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I have never looking into Ada, I have no idea what that language is like.


It's like a really more powerful/sensible version of Pascal, a hyper-strongly typed version of Python, and has a better template system than C++ and arguably a bit better with the low level stuff. It's a shame C++11 doesn't have concepts - because Ada's generics is miles ahead of C++.

* As people know, I prefer C++. Doesn't stop me from liking good features of other languages, unlike critics of C++.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Darn!
by spiderman on Fri 22nd Jun 2012 06:40 in reply to "RE[3]: Darn!"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23


I have never looking into Ada, I have no idea what that language is like.

If you have ever used Oracle's PL/SQL, it's what Ada is, with SQL added.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Darn!
by henderson101 on Fri 22nd Jun 2012 11:57 in reply to "RE[3]: Darn!"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Imagine Pascal, but reworked and designed by a committee. That's pretty much it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Darn!
by henderson101 on Fri 22nd Jun 2012 12:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Darn!"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Ditto. We did ADA at my Uni. But then I did C/C++, Prolog, COBOL, assembler, VB and Pascal after that. Depended on the modules you chose. I liked programming, so I took mostly programming ones.

Reply Parent Score: 2