Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 23rd Jun 2012 14:45 UTC
Apple The only review that matters - as detailed and in-depth as ever. "I'm giving the MacBook Pro with Retina Display our bronze Editor's Choice award. Making it the first Mac to ever receive one. It would have been a silver had the software story been even stronger (iWork, Mountain Lion, Office and Photoshop being ready at launch would have been a feat worth rewarding). And it would have been a gold had Apple been able to deliver all of that but without sacrificing end-user upgradability." The device has performance issues which Mountain Lion will address (to a degree), but for the rest, AnandTech's review details - without being pro or anti-anything - just how good this new MBP really is. As a sidenote, Windows 8 on the retina display further confirms the classic desktop is dead to Microsoft: it still can't handle high-DPI displays properly. With the desktop going the way of the dodo, why would the company make it so?
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winter skies
Member since:
2009-08-21

I humbly think the impossibility to perform simple substitutions, such as changing the RAM, or swapping the SSD for something standard to be easily purchased on the market - as opposed to chips using proprietary, non-standard connectors - are shortcomings that shouldn't be eclipsed by the achievings in the fields of display crispness and ultimate portability.
We are dealing with 2 or 3k$ machines which are becoming more and more like disposable appliances you have to send to service everytime a minor, non-vital component breaks. I think it is utter insanity and will never support such behaviour on part of companies as long as freer, more-easily-fixable products continue to exist.
This new MBPr is really beautiful and light, but I know I won't care about portability at all when SSD's will have become much cheaper and the original 256GB will have shown all their limits, or when my RAM will fry and I'll have to send my work tool to Apple with all my private data inside. It's not acceptable and I hope many customers will voice their opinion by choosing products that do not suspend even such basic forms of freedom.

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/06/opinion-apple-retina-displa/

Reply Score: 8

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

I humbly think the impossibility to perform simple substitutions, such as changing the RAM, or swapping the SSD for something standard to be easily purchased on the market - as opposed to chips using proprietary, non-standard connectors - are shortcomings that shouldn't be eclipsed by the achievings in the fields of display crispness and ultimate portability.


Hard to disagree with that. On the other hand, if I traveled a lot for business and needed something as light and portable as I could get, I might be willing to sacrifice the upgradability of the thing, especially if I had a lot of money and upgrading it every few years didn't hurt the pocketbook that much.

That is about the only instance I could see this machine being acceptable to anyone.

Reply Parent Score: 2

bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

Data privacy...not being forced to send you private company data to apple to be mined...trumps everything. If someone's mac breaks that has upcoming IPO data for the company on it that gets out who do you think goes fined/goes to jail? Same for a lawyer with sensitive data.

Stupid, stupid.

Reply Parent Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

It's not acceptable and I hope many customers will voice their opinion by choosing products that do not suspend even such basic forms of freedom.


Ah, but there in lies the problem. Most people don't care, I am sorry to say. The average person seems to be perfectly willing to believe any hype they're told, and doesn't want to view the long term. Think about it, if most people cared about easy serviceability, would we even be debating this now? The sad fact is that most people don't know how to service their own machines, don't wish to learn, and consequently couldn't care less about it. I am in complete agreement, I will never buy a machine that doesn't have even basic serviceability. Even a Mac Mini is serviceable by the user (in this case me) although a bit cramped and more complicated than it really ought to be. Sadly, it seems even Windows laptop OEMs are beginning to take up this trend.

Reply Parent Score: 2

redshift Member since:
2006-05-06

The SSD is on a connector similar to how the macbook air is. Companies did come up with 3rd party SSD's for the Air, so I expect there will be upgrade options for these too. The soldered ram is disappointing. There was a news article I read last week that quoted Tim Cook as saying that there may be upgradeable ram in a future minor revision of the Mac pro. I hope that is true.

Overall, I am far more disappointed at the demise of the 17" macbook pro. I love my 17" mbp at work. I like a lot of actual desktop space, not just crisp detail. It has been so much lighter to haul around than the dell equivalent I had prior to it.

Edited 2012-06-23 19:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

jptros Member since:
2005-08-26

I haven't read the review in this article but I did read the review on ars the other day which talks about the different resolutions you can achieve with the retina display. You can get 1920x1200 albeit it might not be that usable on a 15" display. Doesn't negate the soldered ram, just saying it can achieve a pretty big workspace.

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2012/06/pixelpalooza-ars-reviews-the-1...

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

That connector was designed by Toshiba, not Apple.

Reply Parent Score: 2

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I am with you on this.

It seems that companies want to return to the 8 and 16 bit days, when software+hardware were tightly coupled together, and all expansions were only possible via external devices.

If the trend continues, we will be back to the Amiga 500/Atari ST/Apple II form factors.

Reply Parent Score: 4

PieterGen Member since:
2012-01-13

Recently I was on a laptop hunt, and I found there are very few servicable laptops on the market. I finally bought a Lenovo Thinkpad, which is the only servicable laptop left. It doesn't have the super high resolution of the newer Apples though ;)

Maybe this is the dark side of consumerisation. Brands aim at the 'brain dead' consumer. GUIs are dumbed down (Metro, OSX, Unity), hardware is locked (Apple, the MS/UEFI scam).

Reply Parent Score: 2

tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

It's pathetic, really. You'd never buy a car that required a tool only used by one small auto body shop in California to pop the hood, even if you had no interest in servicing it yourself. Why do people lose all common sense when it comes to computers?

Reply Parent Score: 2

kristoph Member since:
2006-01-01

1. I - and most consumers - own a car we cannot service. The thing under the hood is a thing of beauty but I honestly don't even know where to put in the oil.

2. It's not a small shop in CA that services your Mac. It's the largest company (by market cap) on Planet Earth with hundreds of locations globally (and in my case, one is 10 minutes walk from my office, another 20 minutes drive from my house).

Better yet, said company won't actually service your new retinal Mac, they will simply give you a new one, that day, while you wait, and they will helpfully transfer all your stuff for you for free!

I do wish I could upgrade the ram but, well, I ordered the 16 gb version last week - have to wait 3 more weeks.

Reply Parent Score: 2

scarr Member since:
2010-11-07

Being on a tech news site, not surprising the majority of us want to "play inside". However, we are most definitely in a very small minority here. Most people I see are scared to even install an Application on their computer! Forget even opening it...

But forget that for a second... User upgradability is really overrated. I've bought so many systems thinking "oh, I'll save some money now on part xyz and upgrade it later", only to find when I need the new piece, I need a lot more new pieces.

You remember a "few years ago" when you thought your parents were old and out to lunch for some of their behaviours? Well, this one is dating us. People buy computers for specific reasons now, not to hack with the hardware. You can still get hardware to hack around (raspberry pi), but don't spend 2k on a notebook and expect to customize the insides of it.

Reply Parent Score: 3