Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 23rd Jun 2012 20:18 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Artificial intelligence is still a long way from delivering the human intelligence in robot form that has long been common in science fiction.
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RE[4]: AI definitions
by Alfman on Sun 24th Jun 2012 17:30 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: AI definitions"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

Fergy,

"I am simply saying what I would expect from an intelligent AI. I am not talking about other animals but I think birds act smarter than the smartest computer characters(and birds aren't that smart)."

I think you're underestimating how accurately computers can simulate things - even to the point where you couldn't differentiate between the real and artificial intelligences. But the problem is the computer lacks a natural physical form and that's a dead give away for the AI. Normal people aren't accustomed to abstracting intelligent actions from their physical actors, but once you get used to doing that as we often do in CS, then you'll realise that most AIs are actually within reach.

Unfortunately technology isn't at a state where we can conceal supercomputers and their energy source within a natural body. While that's surely a disappointment to enthusiasts, the opposite is theoretically possible: taking real animal brains and wiring them up to a virtual, albeit limited environment. You could end up with real animals and AI animals interacting together and never suspecting that the other is different. We might even setup a scenario where a real animal has AI offspring, or visa versa.

Edited 2012-06-24 17:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: AI definitions
by Fergy on Sun 24th Jun 2012 17:50 in reply to "RE[4]: AI definitions"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

I think you're underestimating how accurately computers can simulate things

I would like to see a company that makes AI. Game companies could license the AI. You could tune the AI with parameters like: want to live, scared, passive, language,hungry etc. This would make games far less predictable but still very much enjoyable. Games like Deus Ex and Hitman are about multiple choices but are heavily scripted. This is because the AI company that I mentioned does not exist.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: AI definitions
by Alfman on Sun 24th Jun 2012 18:24 in reply to "RE[5]: AI definitions"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Fergy,

"I would like to see a company that makes AI. Game companies could license the AI. You could tune the AI with parameters like: want to live, scared, passive, language,hungry etc."

Games like globulation already do things like that. Not that I'd promote it as a prime example of good AI, but just saying...with the exception of "language" those things seem to be pretty basic.


Language is rather different though. since it's highly correlated to one's environment. Every species has it's own ways of communicating. Consider elephants using seismic communication, bees using physical gestures, whales using whalesong, birds chirping, etc. These things are unrecognisable to us, yet they are languages for those who use them. With proper training (programming) some animals can learn to understand human languages. Even a human being needs years of continual language input to be trained, and we've built scholarly institutions just for this purpose.

Why should we hold computers to a different standard?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: AI definitions
by jrincayc on Mon 25th Jun 2012 12:31 in reply to "RE[5]: AI definitions"
jrincayc Member since:
2007-07-24

Here is a group that is working on more intelligent game ai:
http://opencog.org/2010/10/opencog-based-game-characters-at-hong-ko...

Edited 2012-06-25 12:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1