Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th Jun 2012 22:38 UTC
Internet & Networking "If you are on Facebook but have never taken a particular shine to Facebook's e-mail capability, Facebook is intent on changing your mind. As of Friday, the company seems to have quietly given or replaced the display e-mail addresses of all of its users with an @facebook.com address, routing any e-mail communiques you would have received back to its own Messages inboxes." Scummy doesn't even begin to describe this.
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The cost of Facebook membership?
by fossil on Mon 25th Jun 2012 23:29 UTC
fossil
Member since:
2009-05-29

How much does it cost? my understanding is approximately $0.00.

What else would anyone expect from a "social networking" site? Did FB ever promise to not to do something like this? If so, who believed it?

I rather wonder if this is legal, are they intercepting mail directed at other addresses and "pirating" it into FB? that might be illegal. On the other hand, do you not think that FB has spread around enough <strike>bribes </strike> campaign contributions to render themselves above the law?

"Nothing is to be had for nothing" Epictetus.

Like Lennie, I don't use this kind of crap, and feel no ill effects. Some of my friends are compulsively fixated on FB and obsess on what they think that others think about them. Puke.

Reply Score: 3

vaette Member since:
2008-08-09

Uh, no, no hijacking. If you look at someones profile they have contact information there, and under email you now have your @facebook.com email address even if you used another email address before. There is no confusion about where mails are going. Also you of course as usual get notifications about messages forwarded to your registered "main" mail account.

I don't really see how this is a "scam", but changing peoples profiles without warning is indeed a bit scummy. I don't think there is much damage done to anyone either way however.

Reply Parent Score: 3

libray Member since:
2005-08-27

Changes like this are what investors like to see. More control= more potential

Reply Parent Score: 3

nej_simon Member since:
2011-02-11

How much does it cost? my understanding is approximately $0.00.

What else would anyone expect from a "social networking" site? Did FB ever promise to not to do something like this? If so, who believed it?


No, but that doesn't mean you can't protest when they do.

Facebook isn't "free" btw. You pay by providing them your personal data and looking at ads.

Reply Parent Score: 3

fmaxwell Member since:
2005-11-13

"Did FB ever promise to not to do something like this?"

I never promised that I would not come over to your house and urinate on your porch. So would that mean that you'd have no grounds for moral outrage if you walked out your door and stepped in a puddle of pee?

I tend to think that you are right about the questionable legality. At the very least, it puts Facebook into a very tenuous legal position were the security of their e-mail to be compromised. Imagine a damaging e-mail (does your company know you are looking for work? did that rash on your d*** clear up or do I need to see a doctor?) being published by a hacker who broke in to FB's e-mail system.

I use FB as a means of logging on to forums to post comments and to "like" companies, products, etc. in order to receive discounts and free offers. That's it. I don't accept friend requests. I turn on all the privacy settings.

If someone is a "friend," they have my e-mail address and/or phone number. I don't need to get on FB and collect "friends" like some needy, tween girl seeking approval.

Reply Parent Score: 2