Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Jun 2012 10:12 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Only a few more hours until the last of the big three has its big event (Google i/o, after WWDC and Microsoft's Surface and WP8 events). They will most likely announce a Nexus tablet, as well as Android 4.1, Jelly Bean. While many of you are still on Gingerbread with your top-of-the-line phones - let me poke a few eyes out with mikegapinski's Android 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich port... To the Samsung Wave. Dual-booting Bada 2 and ICS, right here.
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RE[3]: Comment by avgalen
by Soulbender on Wed 27th Jun 2012 12:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by avgalen"
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

I expect that charging a battery is a hardware function that will work independent of software.


So in other words, it is unrelated to the openness.

I expect that an OS-maker will first focus on getting hardware to work and later on getting software to work.


Why would you expect a software company to focus on hardware?

I expect that when somebody says "Openness. It works." a better example is given than this to make people enthusiastic about openness.


Maybe you're putting too much importance into what some random guy on the internet say about stuff.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by avgalen
by avgalen on Wed 27th Jun 2012 12:34 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by avgalen"
avgalen Member since:
2010-09-23

Apparently this OS plays some role in charging the battery on this device (seriously shocking to me). I am actually wondering where Tom got this information from because I couldn't find it on the page he linked to.

And I don't expect "a software company to focus on hardware?". I expect "an OS-maker will first focus on getting hardware to work".

I am a big fan of Thom and mostly agree with what he writes. But this time I didn't so I voiced my opinion. He didn't seem to like it and his responses were so-called clever one-liners instead of actual on-topic related answers.

On a side-note, I am now not sure anymore if Thom actually wrote that article or just posted someone else's article. As there is no other name mentioned I am assuming Thom wrote it:
Comments: Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Jun 2012 10:12 UTC
Article: posted by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Jun 2012 10:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by avgalen
by phoudoin on Wed 27th Jun 2012 12:42 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by avgalen"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

Apparently this OS plays some role in charging the battery on this device (seriously shocking to me).


More probably on this hardware platform something not set by default should be done by software to enable battery charging.

It doesn't means that every androphone behave the same, or that Android enforce it (which will be hard anyway).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by avgalen
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 27th Jun 2012 12:42 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by avgalen"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I am a big fan of Thom and mostly agree with what he writes. But this time I didn't so I voiced my opinion. He didn't seem to like it and his responses were so-called clever one-liners instead of actual on-topic related answers.


How else am I supposed to respond to someone who clearly doesn't understand how open source development works? Am I really expected - in 20-fcuking-12 - to explain how open source development works?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by avgalen
by Morgan on Fri 29th Jun 2012 00:01 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by avgalen"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Apparently this OS plays some role in charging the battery on this device (seriously shocking to me).


It's most likely a driver issue. The same thing happens when you install Gentoo on a Nokia N900; for all the "openness" of that device, without the proprietary power drivers it won't charge or run from the power supply under alternate OSes. And if the manufacturer is unwilling to release a public driver, the only option left is to reverse-engineer one.

Sounds a lot like early Linux development to me; not shocking at all.

Reply Parent Score: 3