Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Jun 2012 20:27 UTC
Google So yeah, Google totally just won the conference showdown by easily beating both Apple and Microsoft. Not only did Google announce Android 4.1 with some really cool new features, a cheap but non-crippled tablet, and a new Android device called the Nexus Q, but they also opened up pre-orders for Google Glass. So yeah.
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RE: How about starting with this
by tomcat on Thu 28th Jun 2012 01:23 UTC in reply to "How about starting with this"
tomcat
Member since:
2006-01-06

Google has completely lost control of the Android ecosystem and, while that may be by design, it's going to mean that fragmentation will continue to be a huge problem; regardless of what the naysayers claim.

Reply Parent Score: -3

gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

Google has completely lost control of the Android ecosystem....

More importantly, they seem to have lost control of their own app market. People getting malware from side-loading is one thing, but giving it away via your own sanctioned repository is just ridiculous!! Their automated Bouncer has been bollocks thus far. Not everyone (read: nobody) actually pays attention to the permissions an app asks for before installation.

Even though I haven't been affected/infected once, I'd still worry about the overall security reputation of the ecosystem I'm employing.

Edited 2012-06-28 02:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Google has completely lost control of the Android ecosystem and, while that may be by design, it's going to mean that fragmentation will continue to be a huge problem; regardless of what the naysayers claim.

Fragmentation is a moderate problem, not a huge one. A lot of the "naysayers" are quite big players. That includes Unity Tech, Pocket, Animoca and so on.

Reply Parent Score: 6

adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

Unfortunately no one seems to be in control of it except Apple. Even MS flunk the fragmentation test when they've announced that current WP users will be left in the lurch.

I think the only way to remotely solve it would be to only release a few kinds of devices like Apple.

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Unfortunately no one seems to be in control of it except Apple. Even MS flunk the fragmentation test when they've announced that current WP users will be left in the lurch.

They won't be "left in the lurch" - framework stays largely the same, most apps will certainly work. Except, notably, the most complex & demanding (native) games ...which is basically the case on iOS too, older devices often not supported by latest gaming titles.

Reply Parent Score: 2

cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

> Google has completely lost control of the Android ecosystem

You make it sound as its something bad. Googles Android strategy is working well and its partly cause of the open nature of Android. Giving up full control accelerates the Android grow and with it propagation of google's cash cows. Google's cash cows are the services and not full control of Android.

> it's going to mean that fragmentation will continue to be a huge problem

You name it fragmentation, I name it choice. Android can fit more scenarios - what means reach more people what, I repeat, is google's goal - with diverse products.

The whole idea behind Android - may it be licenses, the distribution and the software itself - is to spread, to be adopted by as many different partners as possible, to flood the market and to make google "the door to the internet and online-services". They have no interest in making money with Android licenses, with controlling Android and the Android eco-system.

That is why google will succeed and Microsoft not. Google has a business-model that is so much different from Microsofts that google can and does give away Android to its partners so those partners have the full control and can turn that into an end-user product to make lots of money with. Microsoft's business-model is controlling the eco-system. No control, no money.

Edited 2012-06-28 11:18 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

You make it sound as its something bad.


It is bad. Current estimates are that fewer than 4-7% of tablet users will have access to 4.1 for SEVERAL YEARS. Why? Because it takes Android-based vendors a lot of time to upgrade to more recent builds. And, by that point, Google has created new versions, etc. In other words, the fragmentation means that users have no idea what apps will run on their machines because the ecosystem is so busted.

Reply Parent Score: 0