Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Jun 2012 20:27 UTC
Google So yeah, Google totally just won the conference showdown by easily beating both Apple and Microsoft. Not only did Google announce Android 4.1 with some really cool new features, a cheap but non-crippled tablet, and a new Android device called the Nexus Q, but they also opened up pre-orders for Google Glass. So yeah.
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RE[6]: Seriously?
by Nelson on Thu 28th Jun 2012 09:52 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Seriously?"
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29


Apple: minor hardware updates+one big one, and iOS6 playing catch-up (to come in the Fall).


Oh come on, iOS is an absolutely massive upgrade compared to Android 4.1. Try to be objective.


Microsoft: vapourware tablet nobody has seen in action, and Windows Phone 8 nobody will be able to use until they buy new hardware somewhere in the Fall.


You disregard the entire Windows 8 OEM Computex showing, the Windows Azure redesign offering IaaS, and the Yammer acquisition for enterprise.

WP8 is definitely not vaporware, its just not out yet. It was shown running on devices in its entiriety. You have a confident release window, a feature set shown off in depth, etc

Same with Surface. Most journalists didn't get time on with Surface, but some did. Its more vapory than WP8 but I feel it has its feature set detailed and carved out.

The difference with Project Glass is that at first it was an augmented reality device which was really revolutionary. Now its a head mounted camera, with question mark specs, which may come out next year as a shadow of its former self. Oh, and its $1500 and only available to I/O attendees meaning General Availability is even further out.

Surface, Windows 8, and Windows Phone 8 will be out before the first Project Glass pre order is shipped.


Google: minor Android update with still some major new stuff (available in two weeks+now for attendees), new non-crippled tablet for *$199* (available in two weeks+now for attendees), new streaming device (available in two weeks (?)), and, oh, they're putting Glass up for pre-order.

Easy enough to see who won.


Major new stuff? That's a fucking stretch, considering how you just downplayed iOS6.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: Seriously?
by Morgan on Thu 28th Jun 2012 10:34 in reply to "RE[6]: Seriously?"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

The difference with Project Glass is that at first it was an augmented reality device which was really revolutionary. Now its a head mounted camera, with question mark specs, which may come out next year as a shadow of its former self. Oh, and its $1500 and only available to I/O attendees meaning General Availability is even further out.


That's my biggest problem with Project Glass; they sold us on such an amazing concept, teased us with "it will be in testing next year" and now we find it's a webcam -- a very nice looking one, but still a webcam -- that will cost as much as three of the phones required to use it. Granted, that's a developer special price, but come on! I can build what they demoed with parts lying around my workshop.

I'm really glad Google is serious about bringing Glass to fruition, but they are years away from having The Real Thing if this is all they have right now. Then on top of that, to charge an insane amount of money for a single-function prototype sounds really fishy. Surely Google has the R&D budget already in place for this project, and a few hundred units at $1500 each is probably a fraction of that budget. So why the ridiculous price tag on something that's not even as advanced as a Kinect?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Seriously?
by zima on Wed 4th Jul 2012 23:59 in reply to "RE[7]: Seriously?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

but they are years away from having The Real Thing if this is all they have right now

Many years.

What eye-displays seem to be primarily good at is giving people headaches
...unless they have optical systems which make their size, weight and costs non-trivial (much above 1,5k; like even the newest on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmet-mounted_display )

What people imagine, what people want (yeah... http://www.osnews.com/permalink?525237 ), will be probably possible around the time of holographic displays (by the virtue of tech with pixels comparable to the wavelength of light - essentially also perfect optical surfaces; I mention such eye-display usage in http://www.osnews.com/thread?492454 ) ...but that's at least few decades away.
Laser projection on the retina should be earlier - but that's still quite some time away; plus not what people expect and want, likely quite "schematic" and monochromatic, in plausible consumer implementations.

Edited 2012-07-05 00:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Seriously?
by JAlexoid on Thu 28th Jun 2012 11:07 in reply to "RE[6]: Seriously?"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Oh come on, iOS is an absolutely massive upgrade compared to Android 4.1. Try to be objective.

Sorry, but if we compare it in the context of competition it is not a major update. If we take it in a vacuum - yes it's a major step for iOS.(Though iOS 5 was a bigger step forward) Is that objective enough?

Same with Surface. Most journalists didn't get time on with Surface, but some did. Its more vapory than WP8 but I feel it has its feature set detailed and carved out.

Compared to how Google Glass is presented, that you call vapourware, no one did have any time with Surface. Even Joshua Topolsky is saying that the "handlers" were yanking the devices out of journalists hands if they tried to actually use it.

And as I said before - you really have an issue with Android. Considering how much swearwords you use.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[8]: Seriously?
by Nelson on Thu 28th Jun 2012 11:15 in reply to "RE[7]: Seriously?"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


Sorry, but if we compare it in the context of competition it is not a major update. If we take it in a vacuum - yes it's a major step for iOS.(Though iOS 5 was a bigger step forward) Is that objective enough?


Yes, that's what I would consider objective. I think it is dismissive to say "Androids event is bigger than Apples or Microsofts events" because each made great strides for their respective platforms.

No platform has exact feature parity with the other, other platforms prioritize different features above others, and roadmaps don't line up. So I think viewing the achievements in isolation is the best way to do it.

iOS6 is a monumental step forward in the context of iOS. They add a bunch of new features.

Windows Phone 8, again replaces the core of the OS with Windows 8 and underlying WinRT infrastructure. Adds a ton on top of that.

Before that there was Android 3.0 and 4.0 which were in their own right major upgrades.

There's Windows Phone Mango which added a crap load of features.

I mean, if we only view this through the lens of "compared to iOS" or "compared to Android" we're going to get a bunch of skewed results.


Compared to how Google Glass is presented, that you call vapourware, no one did have any time with Surface. Even Joshua Topolsky is saying that the "handlers" were yanking the devices out of journalists hands if they tried to actually use it.


I think its pretty comparable. Glass lacked the Augmented Reality features it was announced with. Surface had limited play time.

So while they were restricted in different fashions, the end result is largely the same.

Difference being the core thing powering Surface (Windows RT) has been detailed and shown off before. There's a lot more stability in Surface's ability to ship vs Project Glass.

Whereas Windows 8 shipping is an inevitability, and by extension Surface (they've quoted weeks after Win8 general availability, and they've been vague on prices to prevent a spiral to the bottom before launch), I think Project Glass is riskier.

First, again, consumers can't order these things. It's Google I/O attendees only. Second, its a shell of its former self.


And as I said before - you really have an issue with Android. Considering how much swearwords you use.


I have an issue with frustrating user experience. Android just seems to have a large concentration of it.

I can rant about Windows Phone's failings for pages if you let me.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Seriously?
by dsmogor on Thu 28th Jun 2012 13:37 in reply to "RE[6]: Seriously?"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

For me the Glass was more of projecting contextual info and making it more integrated than AR. Something for making Localization Services central to the experience.

And that is wholly dependent on whether you can put that information on the first place, Google is the company that can most probably pull that off (imagine if they teamed up with Nokia on this, that would be match made in heaven), but I presume it will be US only for long time after introduction.

Reply Parent Score: 2