Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 2nd Jul 2012 22:17 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Nokia board chairman Risto Siilasmaa went on a Finnish television show, and stated that while he is confident in Windows Phone 8, the company does have a back-up plan if it doesn't work out. Speculation aplenty - what is this backup plan? The answer's pretty easy, if you ask me.
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RE: backup plan
by ins0mniac on Mon 2nd Jul 2012 22:50 UTC in reply to "backup plan"
ins0mniac
Member since:
2008-10-01

I'm not so sure about that. We recently switched the GSM provider at the office and had the opportunity to buy subsidized phones and the Lumia 800 was offered at 49€, but we still went for HTC Androids and iPhone at much higher prices. Would it have been running Android the situation certainly would have been different.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: backup plan
by allanregistos on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 04:36 in reply to "RE: backup plan"
allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

I'm not so sure about that. We recently switched the GSM provider at the office and had the opportunity to buy subsidized phones and the Lumia 800 was offered at 49€, but we still went for HTC Androids and iPhone at much higher prices. Would it have been running Android the situation certainly would have been different.

I agree with you. In my country, Nokia was supplanted by Samsung. And almost all Samsung had the Android name on it, that is, people will buy Samsung if it runs Android. If Nokia is to provide an Android powered device, those Samsung and Sony Android buyers will prefer Nokia, because Nokia is still the best in terms of hardware quality. Nokia is tested in almost two decades of hardware quality.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: backup plan
by cdude on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 10:40 in reply to "RE[2]: backup plan"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

Well, its not the hardware that sells but the complete product what includes hardware, software and everthing around to bring it to the customers.

Samsung is doing so well cause there complete products are so good. Its not like they only take Android and build hardware around but they put lots of efforts into extending Android and making software and hardware into a finished product that beats all its competition like just happened with the S3.

Nokia will have a hard time to hire skilled Android people to offer something similar. I mean who likes to work for a dying company that is changing strategy every few months and fires its developers when doing so? They need to put lots of money into that to convince high talented people to join them.

But Nokia does not have the money. When WP8 hits market till proven that it failed too Nokia burned most of its cash. Nokia is rated junk so they will have a hard time to get new cash.

I doubt they already have something in there labs. I doubt they can get a competing Android device done in time before running out of cash. I doubt they have the talent left to make that work. I doubt plan B is going to work. Its to late and to much was burned to still turn around successfully.

Edited 2012-07-03 10:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: backup plan
by JamesTRexx on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 16:47 in reply to "RE: backup plan"
JamesTRexx Member since:
2005-11-06

I can tell you're lucky the office didn't go for Windows phone, unless you do absolutely nothing with email on the phone.
Tried to configure the Exchange account for one of our customers on those Lumias in a reasonable way. Nothing worked to get it to accept the local domain certificate other than mailing it to the Live account (having to enable that for email sync temporarily) and installing it from there.
So unless the Exchange server has an official (paid for) certificate you're screwed.
Long live Android and iPhone with the ability to accept custom certificates.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: backup plan
by ins0mniac on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 20:33 in reply to "RE[2]: backup plan"
ins0mniac Member since:
2008-10-01

It's so funny you mentioned the Exchange integration issues, it reminded me how things are tied together when you look at the big picture. We used to run our own email server (it was Sendmail on Solaris) until I got my first Android. Then I looked at the great Gmail app and then the email app on the phone. It also happened that I had some problems with the anti-spam software setup and I decided that I should give Google Apps a try. We are happy Google Apps users since then and I've also converted a few others.

Reply Parent Score: 2