Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 09:37 UTC
Legal So let me get this straight. Nokia claims that the Nexus 7 infringes upon standard essential wifi patents, and that Asus does not have a license. How in the name of hell is it possible that Asus has been shipping a gazillion wifi-enabled products every year for god knows how long now, and only now does Nokia notice? Wait - of course. Silly me. If you can't compete, litigate. D'oh.
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RE: So?
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 09:54 UTC in reply to "So?"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

They're standard essential patents which Nokia is willing to license on Fair, Reasonable, and Non Discriminatory terms (FRAND).


So, why not come to Asus in the past decade or so Asus has been shipping wifi products? Why now? And with an Android product specifically? After a Microsoft man takes over Nokia? I'm sure it's all coincidence!

Contrast this with Motorola who is actively seeking injunctions using FRAND patents and has landed them in hot water with the EU launching an anti-trust probe.


If you're defending yourself from patent trolls like Apple and patent mafia like Microsoft... It sucks they're using FRAND-stuff, but considering it's a defensive move, it's understandable.


And it's supposedly Nokia who litigates because they can't compete?


Let's see.

1) Nokia can't compete. The company is in a massive downwards spiral.
2) They are litigating.

So yes.

Reply Parent Score: 12

RE[2]: So?
by AStubbs on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 10:11 in reply to "RE: So?"
AStubbs Member since:
2012-07-03

Thom
I can't agree with your points because of two reasons.
1st We don't have enough information to draw a conclusion. Do you know for instance if having a Windows license when you sell a computer includes the wifi license? Do you know if ASUS has paid Nokia for wifi licenses on other products but not this one?

Secondly you say that Nokia is now choosing to litigate because it is failing in the market but Nokia has in fact consistently defending its patent portfolio for the last two decades.

I don't like all this patent disputes that keep cropping up but when your a company like Nokia who has spent more on R&D than the rest of the industry put together can you blame them for wanting to stop companies getting a free ride on their work and research? That is why FRAND exists.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: So?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 13:53 in reply to "RE[2]: So?"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

That's kind of a good point wifi is probably included in the windows license, if its a software patent. If its hardware, though... Thom's point stands.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: So?
by andydread on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 16:05 in reply to "RE[2]: So?"
andydread Member since:
2009-02-02

Standards should not be patent encumbered PERIOD. File your patents all you want but keep your shitty patents AWAY from standards. how about that. All this bullshit about FRAND is missing the point. patent encumbered standards BLOCK free products from the market place and they block open source from participating in that standard so all your cheerleading about FRAND is totally missing the point.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: So?
by Nelson on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 10:22 in reply to "RE: So?"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


So, why not come to Asus in the past decade or so Asus has been shipping wifi products? Why now? And with an Android product specifically? After a Microsoft man takes over Nokia? I'm sure it's all coincidence!


Two things. First, they've made no indication they're actually going to sue. This is in response to questioning. They simply confirmed ASUS and Google are not licensees.

Second, Nokia has discretion to assert its patents whenever it feels like it. Why is Motorola waiting until now to sue over FRAND? Because it feels like it.



If you're defending yourself from patent trolls like Apple and patent mafia like Microsoft... It sucks they're using FRAND-stuff, but considering it's a defensive move, it's understandable.


Unbelievable that you can defend such an egregious abuse of software patents. You talk about the evils of software patents, well this is arguably the most nefarious.


Let's see.

1) Nokia can't compete. The company is in a massive downwards spiral.
2) They are litigating.

So yes.


They are not litigating. Motorola is. Your statement, and this article is inaccurate. Of course, I don't expect you to admit you're wrong. You never do.

Edited 2012-07-03 10:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: So?
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 10:39 in reply to "RE[2]: So?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Two things. First, they've made no indication they're actually going to sue. This is in response to questioning. They simply confirmed ASUS and Google are not licensees.


They're not litigating, you're right. This is the first step though, as history has taught us. Pattern recognition: when a technology company is in a downward spiral, they start to sue. It's inevitable like the tides rolling in.

Why is Motorola waiting until now to sue over FRAND? Because it feels like it.


Because they have to deal with aggressive patent lawsuits and extortion by people who can't compete on merit. Motorola sued defensively, not offensively.

Unbelievable that you can defend such an egregious abuse of software patents. You talk about the evils of software patents, well this is arguably the most nefarious.


Right, a defensive lawsuit is more nefarious than Microsoft's long-filename bullshit or Apple slide-to-unlock nonsense.

Right. If somebody starts punching me in the face and I happen to have a bat in my hands, sure as hell I'm going to use it to defend myself.

Edited 2012-07-03 10:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: So?
by JAlexoid on Tue 3rd Jul 2012 12:50 in reply to "RE[2]: So?"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Unbelievable that you can defend such an egregious abuse of software patents. You talk about the evils of software patents, well this is arguably the most nefarious.

Just a note: Moto's patents don't look like they are all software patents(even H264 can be interpreted both ways). Nokia's WiFi patents don't look like software patents as well.

Reply Parent Score: 3