Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Jul 2012 23:08 UTC
Google Apparently, this is a major victory of the patent system. This, this right here, this is what the patent system has come to. This is the destructive effect it's having on this once beautiful industry. Thanks to trolls like Apple and Microsoft, basic, elemental functionality is being removed from devices people already own.
Thread beginning with comment 525468
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[7]: No.
by ricegf on Thu 5th Jul 2012 20:02 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: No."
ricegf
Member since:
2007-04-25

You must have overlooked Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, who switched to the Democratic party on April 28, 2009 and gave Mr. Obama his "60th vote". The two "independents" you note were simple Democrats who lost their primary battles to strong anti-war activists, then went on to win the general election as moderate "independents" - but they still caucused with the D's and usually voted with Mr. Obama.

As far as the Republicans being "aligned on policy", you must have also overlooked the Tea Party wing running their own candidates against the conventional Republican candidates since 2008. In Texas, those are actually more interesting than the general election, since the D's win an election here about as often as the Cubs win the pennant. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: No.
by Nelson on Thu 5th Jul 2012 20:14 in reply to "RE[7]: No."
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

You must have overlooked Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, who switched to the Democratic party on April 28, 2009 and gave Mr. Obama his "60th vote". The two "independents" you note were simple Democrats who lost their primary battles to strong anti-war activists, then went on to win the general election as moderate "independents" - but they still caucused with the D's and usually voted with Mr. Obama.


Specter was a usually solid vote. Ben Nelson, Claire McCaskill, Jim Webb, and others not so much. It was enough to be problematic.

At our peak, on paper we only ever had 59, and this was after Sen. Franken was finally sworn in. Then there was Sen. Byrd and Sen. Kennedy who we know what happened to them. Replaced by who? Joe Manchin, the guy might as well be a Republican and Scott Brown a Republican.

On top of that, there are various factions within the Democratic party. There are the union guys, the anti-abortion guys, the progressives, etc.

Bringing all those votes together is a herculean feat.

As much as Obama probably wanted a rubber stamp, he hardly had one for two years. Health care had to be procedurally rammed through the Senate.


As far as the Republicans being "aligned on policy", you must have also overlooked the Tea Party wing running their own candidates against the conventional Republican candidates since 2008. In Texas, those are actually more interesting than the general election, since the D's win an election here about as often as the Cubs win the pennant. ;-)


Ha, I think the divide between Republicans and Tea Partiers is smaller than the divide between most Democrats. Either that, or Republicans can capitulate better because they seem to have no problem besides a little discomfort in ramming their policies through.

Edited 2012-07-05 20:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2