Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th Jul 2012 22:27 UTC, submitted by Piet Simons
In the News Interesting charts by Horace Dediu: "As a result the Mac began to whittle down the advantage Windows had. The ratio of Windows to Mac units shipped fell to below 20, a level that was last reached before Windows 95 launched. It's as if the Mac reversed the Windows advantage. This was an amazing turnaround for the Mac. But the story does not end there." Too bad Dediu didn't include Android devices in his charts. The picture would change dramatically, and would downplay the important of either Windows or Mac/iOS. We're in a three-horse race - not the two-horse race Dediu paints.
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shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

It doesn't make sense to neglect either one, or to make something with "one size fits all" method. Both use cases need distinct design approaches, and those who don't address them separately are degrading the user experience.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I just really don't think so. As Desktops become more and more niche devices, they command less and less attention. I think many people have a desktop to have one, not because they actually get tons of work done on it. Switching to other form factors I think will be natural and an eventuality for a lot of consumers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

I can imagine how someone will try using a complex IDE, graphical or publishing / video / audio editors, or some 3D modeling software on a tablet. It's simply doesn't let such kind of usage productively. So desktops aren't going anywhere. Tablets might become more widespread, but desktops are here to stay. And it's good to remember, that making and debugging programs for those very tablets developers will prefer using comfortable widescreen monitors and ergonomic keyboards. Therefore any universal OS needs to address regular desktop use case.

Edited 2012-07-06 07:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

It doesn't make sense to neglect either one, or to make something with "one size fits all" method. Both use cases need distinct design approaches, and those who don't address them separately are degrading the user experience.

That is a bit false dichotomy, sort of - what if there is an UI approach which nicely brings them together, perhaps ending up largely better than the present disjointed state?
For us to know, this needs to be tried first... or the alternative (quoting somebody http://www.osnews.com/permalink?526476 ) "With this logic nothing new can ever be produced. It's the mood of total stagnation. [...] Those who don't want can stay behind." (surely such views are not dependent on whether it's about MS or some OSS darling...)

Edited 2012-07-13 00:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2