Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 6th Jul 2012 22:42 UTC
Mozilla & Gecko clones Mozilla has announced it's ceasing development on Thunderbird; one more version will be released, and it'll be security updates from then on. "Most Thunderbird users seem happy with the basic email feature set. In parallel, we have seen the rising popularity of Web-based forms of communications representing email alternatives to a desktop solution. Given this, focusing on stability for Thunderbird and driving innovation through other offerings seems a natural choice." Makes sense - I mean, there's only so much you can do with something that needs to send and receive mail, and I can't imagine Thunderbird having a lot of users. Strange, almost Microsoftian obtuse announcement, by the way.
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RE[3]: I don't like this trend
by Soulbender on Sat 7th Jul 2012 05:53 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I don't like this trend"
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

i agree with you but most people are morons...

If you use it for any resemblance of a profession, webmail is definitely not the way to go. Not that it can't be done, just that it shouldn't.


The same could be said about people who think that using a thick desktop client makes you more professional.

Consulting your email on random computers is a security risk waiting to happen.


Using a desktop client does not make it any less of a security risk though. In fact, it makes it more of a security risk in some ways since all your emails are stored unencrypted on your disk.

Reply Parent Score: 1

MasterChief Member since:
2012-06-20

Hum, so it is simple to steal a desktop computer, than your webmail password and acess all your mails??

You live in a very dangerous country....

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Of course not, don't be silly. I said that when using random computers using a desktop client is not more secure.
As for webmail passwords, considering that any serious provider is going to use SSL I dont see how you'd go about stealing that very easily. It's certainly not easier (or harder) than stealing your IMAP or POP3 password.

Reply Parent Score: 2

maccouch Member since:
2012-03-14


The same could be said about people who think that using a thick desktop client makes you more professional.


It doesn't make *you* more professional, but it is better for the exercise of your profession. I can give you several advantages of having a desktop client as a professional:
+ It allows you having every budget, project file and workplan while offline (on trips, off site, while the company internet is down)
+ it allows you to keep doing your work while offline (you need to send a mail/work to your colleagues you can keep writing it and adding stuff, whith no change to the workflow whatsoever and the desktop client will send it when there's connectivity, no problem whatsoever.
+ it allows you a local addressbook & local calendar, that other applications can use.
+ it allows easy "new mail" notifications without me frequently checking my browser or losing some time sensitive information
+ it allows simple adding of mail info to other programs such as calendar. most desktop clients recognize specific info and allow you to act on it with other program (outlook on that kind of stuff is pretty amazing)
+ it allows for easy writing or consultation of different emails (you can do that with browser tabs obviously, but i find more practical to have a tiny window of text that an full sized browser window with all the extra "cruft" a browser has)
+ it allows for easy and time stamped backup of your email as part of the normal and scheduled desktop backup. No dependency of other company security policy
+ it allows you a "handmade" easy backup by just copying the mail folders/archives to a dvd or cd.
+ this is highly personal but i find myself much less "distracted" if i don't have the browser running. For many no "normal" internet is a productivity enhancer
+ You can easily store each emails as single files (on most programs you just drag the message to the desktop and .eml file is created there. Great for creating a comprehensive "single issue" folders.

maybe there are more, i don't know or remember all, but apart of having your email accessible from every browser, which you can still do if you're using a desktop client, can you give me any advantage of using a web based email interface for use in a "professional environment" ?



Using a desktop client does not make it any less of a security risk though. In fact, it makes it more of a security risk in some ways since all your emails are stored unencrypted on your disk.


I don't know about you but my home folder is encrypted as are my passwords storage. Most medium to large size companies also buy full disk encryption software to use in all their portable computers. And i would probably guess that the probability of having one of several random computer that i could use infected with a keylogger is probably much bigger than the probability of someone having physical access to my desktop/laptop that probably sits most of the time at corporate locations.

Reply Parent Score: 6

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

+ It allows you having every budget, project file and workplan while offline (on trips, off site, while the company internet is down)


Why are you storing this in your email?

+ it allows you to keep doing your work while offline


Sure but here you equate "work" with "writing emails". I'd like to think that work is a little more varied.

+ it allows you a local addressbook & local calendar


Many email clients can sync contacts and calendars with online services thus making those available offline and to other apps.

+ it allows easy "new mail" notifications


Google mail has desktop notifications, providing the browser is running. If that's not the case you can often use a dedicated email checker to check for new emails.

+ it allows for easy writing or consultation of different emails (you can do that with browser tabs obviously


Some webmail clients (for example Zimbra) can do the same without needing to open each message in a new tab.

+ it allows you a "handmade" easy backup by just copying the mail folders/archives to a dvd or cd.


Zimbra, for example, can export mail folders as archives.

+ You can easily store each emails as single files (on most programs you just drag the message to the desktop and .eml file is created there. Great for creating a comprehensive "single issue" folders.


Or you can put them in a dedicated mail folder. I really see no advantage with saving them as files for this purpose.

can you give me any advantage of using a web based email interface for use in a "professional environment"?


No but I never said it was better. It can, however, be just as good as a desktop client.

And i would probably guess that the probability of having one of several random computer that i could use infected with a keylogger is probably much bigger than the probability


Right and a desktop client does not defeat keyloggers so you're equally screwed as with webmail.

Reply Parent Score: 2

maccouch Member since:
2012-03-14

i just went to the gmail web interface (i mostly don't use gmail any more) and, using chrome, i couldn't even find a way of right clicking on a email and opening in a new tab!? wtf? i remember that i used to be able to do that, but not any more?!

Reply Parent Score: 1

Gooberslot Member since:
2006-08-02

Using a desktop client does not make it any less of a security risk though. In fact, it makes it more of a security risk in some ways since all your emails are stored unencrypted on your disk.


All my emails are stored encrypted on disk and backed up. Way more secure than webmail.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

All my emails are stored encrypted on disk and backed up.


Good for you but that is a) not the default behavior of most (any?) desktop client and b) that's not the point. The point is that when using random computers a desktop client is not more secure than webmail and can in fact be less so.

Reply Parent Score: 2