Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 8th Jul 2012 22:54 UTC
General Development "In this tiny ebook I'm going to show you how to get started writing 6502 assembly language. [...] I think it's valuable to have an understanding of assembly language. Assembly language is the lowest level of abstraction in computers - the point at which the code is still readable. Assembly language translates directly to the bytes that are executed by your computer's processor. If you understand how it works, you've basically become a computer magician." More of this, please.
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RE: Why 6502 vs x86?
by Kochise on Mon 9th Jul 2012 05:17 UTC in reply to "Why 6502 vs x86?"
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03

Have you *ever* tried 6502 assembly vs. 80x86 assembly ? Does real mode, segmented memory, int 10 means somethig for you ? Once that will happen, you'll freak out and love 6502 assembly.

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Why 6502 vs x86?
by moondevil on Mon 9th Jul 2012 07:05 in reply to "RE: Why 6502 vs x86?"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Have you *ever* tried 6502 assembly vs. 80x86 assembly ? Does real mode, segmented memory, int 10 means somethig for you ? Once that will happen, you'll freak out and love 6502 assembly.


To be fair the PC architecture is much more complex and the main reason initially the 8086 was like that was to reduce production costs.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Why 6502 vs x86?
by jgagnon on Mon 9th Jul 2012 17:17 in reply to "RE: Why 6502 vs x86?"
jgagnon Member since:
2008-06-24

One thing I hated about 6502/6510 assembly was the lack of multiply and divide. On my C64 I could call the basic routines to do it or implement it myself, but that still sucks. :p

Reply Parent Score: 2