Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 9th Jul 2012 02:01 UTC
Microsoft "Analyzing one of American corporate history's greatest mysteries - the lost decade of Microsoft - two-time George Polk Award winner (and V.F.'s newest contributing editor) Kurt Eichenwald traces the 'astonishingly foolish management decisions' at the company that 'could serve as a business-school case study on the pitfalls of success'."
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RE: It is a shame
by ephracis on Mon 9th Jul 2012 12:31 UTC in reply to "It is a shame"
ephracis
Member since:
2007-09-23

What is so crappy with managed code or WPF?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: It is a shame
by ThomasFuhringer on Mon 9th Jul 2012 15:04 in reply to "RE: It is a shame"
ThomasFuhringer Member since:
2007-01-25

They had a lot of managed code in Vista which they ripped out in the next version because it turned out to be not so good an idea...
Ever tried to do a real application in WPF? Where are those great WPF applications after all those years?
They lost 10 years in replacing MFC with something better.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: It is a shame
by ephracis on Mon 9th Jul 2012 15:15 in reply to "RE[2]: It is a shame"
ephracis Member since:
2007-09-23

Ever tried to do a real application in WPF? Where are those great WPF applications after all those years?

Yes. Yes, I did. It's called Stoffi Music Player.

But maybe you don't consider it real enough.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: It is a shame
by MollyC on Mon 9th Jul 2012 17:33 in reply to "RE[2]: It is a shame"
MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

Where are those great WPF applications after all those years?


WPF didn't take off (I believe that Visual Studio itself is a WPF app that's in pretty wide use, as well as accompanying apps like Blend), but where are the Java/FX, Adobe Air, and Google Gears apps? I remember articles written for each of those where those frameworks were going to take over the world (particularly the Google Gears thing, which Google finally killed off). You act like putting together a new app API framework and getting it widely adopted is easy. It ain't.

Reply Parent Score: 2