Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th Jul 2012 10:15 UTC
In the News Andrew Binstock interviews Alan Kay, and there are just so many fantastic quotes and insights in there I have no idea what to pick as the OSNews item. This one? "Pop culture holds a disdain for history. Pop culture is all about identity and feeling like you're participating. It has nothing to do with cooperation, the past or the future - it's living in the present," Kay argues, "I think the same is true of most people who write code for money. They have no idea where [their culture came from] - and the Internet was done so well that most people think of it as a natural resource like the Pacific Ocean, rather than something that was man-made. When was the last time a technology with a scale like that was so error-free? The Web, in comparison, is a joke. The Web was done by amateurs." What about this gem? "I was never a great programmer. That's what got me into making more powerful programming languages." Or, my personal favourite: "My interest in education is unglamorous. I don't have an enormous desire to help children, but I have an enormous desire to create better adults." Read this. Now. That's an order.
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kokara4a
Member since:
2005-09-16

If anything, pop culture since 1990 has been a long series of revivals.

Maybe because the consumers don't remember it! So it feels new and wasn't too much of an effort to come up with. Just a thought..

Reply Parent Score: 3

No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

In my experience, it's rather a constant nostalgia for a time when those things were fresh. Band t-shirts from specific tours are collectors items, souvenirs from the history of rock'n'roll.

Then again, talking in general about "pop culture" is a bit like generalising about women or Europeans or colours or books: it's a fairly broad and diverse spectrum, and a constantly changing one at that. Whereas punk in its heyday certainly could be said to "hold a disdain for history", it's now reduced to trite nostalgia for a time when revolt still seemed possible, and had a specific aesthetics.

Reply Parent Score: 3