Linked by moondevil on Wed 11th Jul 2012 22:49 UTC
Mac OS X Ars Technica is reporting that certain 64bit Mac models won't be able to run Mountain Lion. The problem is the graphic card drivers; these are still 32bit, and Apple is unwilling to update them to 64bit. A 64bit kernel can't load 32bit drivers, so that's that. Apple has a list of supported models on their Mountain Lion upgrade page, so you can easily check if your computer is capable of running Mountain Lion.
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No biggie
by demosthenese on Wed 11th Jul 2012 23:48 UTC
demosthenese
Member since:
2011-02-01

Just buy a new mac.

Posted from my iPhone.

Reply Score: 15

RE: No biggie
by Quake on Thu 12th Jul 2012 00:12 in reply to "No biggie"
Quake Member since:
2005-10-14

I hope that was a sarcastic remark...

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE: No biggie
by Morgan on Thu 12th Jul 2012 00:20 in reply to "No biggie"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I know your comment was meant as bait, but yeah that might be an option for some. Another option would be to pass on Mountain Lion, and yet another would be to sell the Mac and buy a current generation i5/i7 Windows machine. You could even install a 64-bit GNU/Linux OS or a BSD alongside Windows and get your *nix on that way.

As for me? Well, my only Mac runs system 7.5.3 and boots in 10 seconds. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: No biggie
by henderson101 on Thu 12th Jul 2012 00:25 in reply to "RE: No biggie"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Mine runs System 6 and boots in like, 2 seconds. *

* Power of factory installed ROM based OS (Mac Classic, has system 6 in ROM)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: No biggie
by quackalist on Thu 12th Jul 2012 00:44 in reply to "RE: No biggie"
quackalist Member since:
2007-08-27

Another option might be to create a stink...wtf, why am I always surprised at the contempt Apple has for it's customers. Isn't one of the supposed 'pluses' of controlling both hardware and the OS that a limited...

why bother.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: No biggie
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 12th Jul 2012 05:24 in reply to "RE: No biggie"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Yeah... I have a 2007 macbok. No mountain lion for it. Not buying a new one, Its nice that things like netflix work, but I never got used to the *BSD userland I miss gnu when I'm on it. Plus, I'm not happy with the direction of the OS. Maybe I'll look into getting plasma active working on a transformer prime or something.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: No biggie
by phoudoin on Thu 12th Jul 2012 06:41 in reply to "No biggie"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

No needs to.
You can still perfectly install other 64bits operating system available and able to run on this old Mac computer.

It's not like Apple keep secret information needed for alternative operating systems to boot on their machines.

Wait!
Oh well. Nevermind.
Let's just buy a new Mac.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: No biggie
by lucas_maximus on Thu 12th Jul 2012 09:47 in reply to "RE: No biggie"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

It isn't kept secret, they simply don't support it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: No biggie
by Yann64 on Thu 12th Jul 2012 11:56 in reply to "No biggie"
Yann64 Member since:
2006-04-14

Or "upgrade" it with a GNU/Linux distribution. Did that 3 years ago on my 4.1 MacBook, now I almost never boot into OSX.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: No biggie
by stew on Thu 12th Jul 2012 17:00 in reply to "RE: No biggie"
stew Member since:
2005-07-06

If I didn't want to run OS X, I wouldn't have bought a Mac.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: No biggie
by zima on Wed 18th Jul 2012 23:52 in reply to "RE: No biggie"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Or "upgrade" it with a GNU/Linux distribution.

You know, perhaps it's really telling how you put upgrade in quotes... :p (also, google for unnecessary quoting for other examples)

Edited 2012-07-18 23:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: No biggie
by fithisux on Thu 12th Jul 2012 15:40 in reply to "No biggie"
fithisux Member since:
2006-01-22

That is why Apple should have allowed more participation from the community. Older macs could be used with Gnu-Darwin, Pure Darwin or some other Unixoid combination of GNU/BSD userland and Apple's kernel instead of render them useless. With open source drivers at least they could have used them without 3D acceleration. A VESA framebuffer or a user supported 2d accelerated driver can do a lot of stuff (developoment,simulations and even browsing and document writing). But if they have implemented a proper UEFI, at least they could have used a generic GOP driver.

But user contributed XNU unixoids are doomed without Apple's help. Puredarwin could be a place to start.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: No biggie
by lucas_maximus on Thu 12th Jul 2012 17:29 in reply to "RE: No biggie"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Apple make money on the hardware not the OS. There is zero motivation for them to do this.

Edited 2012-07-12 17:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: No biggie
by zima on Mon 16th Jul 2012 01:45 in reply to "RE: No biggie"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

That is why Apple should have allowed more participation from the community. Older macs could be used with Gnu-Darwin, Pure Darwin or some other Unixoid combination of GNU/BSD userland and Apple's kernel instead of render them useless. [...]
But user contributed XNU unixoids are doomed without Apple's help. Puredarwin could be a place to start.

OpenDarwin (of which Pure Darwin is an offshot) had some backing from Apple. Thing is, uptake by the community was nil, there is no interest.

Once you throw out OS X userland, there's nothing particularly compelling about what's left - if you're going to use more typical *nix userlands, GUIs, you might as well just use some BSD or Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2