Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 17th Jul 2012 22:19 UTC, submitted by Nth_Man
Games "The truth is that this is the first post of the Valve Linux blog. This blog is where you can find the latest information from Valve about our Linux development efforts. Avoid the rumors and speculations that multiply on the Web. Instead, come to the source - a blog where people who are interested in Linux and open source game development can get the latest information on Valve's efforts in this arena. In this initial post, we'll introduce the team (and a bit of its history) and then give you a snapshot of what we're currently doing." Steam, Source, and Left 4 Dead 2 coming to Linux. We know why.
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RE: At last...
by bassbeast on Wed 18th Jul 2012 19:59 UTC in reply to "At last..."
bassbeast
Member since:
2007-11-11

Sadly you won't be and here is why: DirectX. Like it or not when Kronos gave up the race most devs moved to DirectX and never looked back, now go look on steam and see how many directX games there are VS how many OpenGL.

No what this means in reality is that while Valve will let you run it on Linux if you want the focus will be on a "SteamBox" that runs only ONE CPU and ONE GPU so that devs only have to target that one specific platform, all because Gabe at Valve was given the finger over the Win 8 appstore.

The sad part is this WILL fail, because the other AAA houses won't care if its X86 or not, because the second they see it goes in the living room they start rubbing their hands in glee and thinking about how much they can rip off the customers. Steam on windows will STILL be the source for cheap gaming, Steam on Linux will have the Valve titles and some indie stuff and not much else, while the SteamBox will be as locked down as the PS3 and the games will be just as high.

I really wish it weren't so, and maybe if the community were to fork OpenGL away from Kronos it could change, but as it is now OpenGL is a mess compared to DirectX. With DirectX you only have to target the number, as DirectX 10 is DirectX 10 period, whereas with OpenGL because Kronos let it stagnate to appease the CAD vendors the vendors went with extensions so if a card is say OpenGL 4 it may support SOME of the features THIS way if its AMD, THAT way if its Nvidia, and another if its Intel.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: At last...
by Nth_Man on Fri 20th Jul 2012 14:04 in reply to "RE: At last..."
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

I really wish it weren't so, and maybe if the community were to fork OpenGL

Perhaps you'll find this useful:
As the latest Valve Linux news for today [...] Last week Valve had the Intel OTC Linux graphics team [...] to jointly work on the OpenGL renderer for the Source Engine and the Intel Mesa driver...
There's more in http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=MTE0MzQ

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: At last...
by bassbeast on Sat 21st Jul 2012 05:13 in reply to "RE[2]: At last..."
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

And how EXACTLY does that fix the fact that Kronos is letting OpenGL rot? It doesn't, all it will mean is that Intel will have "Valve approved" drivers for GPUs that frankly are still waaaay behind the curve. There is a good reason why Intel IGPs are looked upon as business laptop junk, because even a 3 year old AMD or Nvidia card will drink its milkshake while it stands there crying.

In the end the ONLY way you can fix this mess is the community fork openGL away from kronos, because they have made it clear its all about CAD to them, which isn't surprising since most of their money comes from CAD vendors. Until you can just say "OpenGL 4" and ANY game developer knows EXACTLY what features they have down the line and EXACTLY how it will behave its just not gonna compete. as it is now again the extensions mean it works one way for AMD, another way for Nvidia, and still a third for Intel. This won't change that because Kronos won't change.

Reply Parent Score: 2