Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Jul 2012 21:12 UTC
Windows The moment Microsoft announced it would lock other browsers out of being installed on Windows RT, we all knew regulatory bodies the world over were wringing their hands. Today, this has been confirmed: in the wake of an investigation into Microsoft not complying with the existing antitrust rulings regarding browser choice, the EU has also announced it's investigating Windows 8 x86 and Windows 8 RT (ARM).
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mistersoft
Member since:
2011-01-05

I agree with Thom's sentiment that in terms of an anti competitive investigation, this is focusing on browsers (in Win8/WinRT) other than IE10 potentially not having access to 'special APIs' allowing greater, or smoother or more integrated operation than their platform-native competitor...

why do browsers get this special attention..??
I mean really!!? why, if the EU Commission (or the US DOJ or Federal trade commision etc) are SO INTERESTED in allowing WE THE PEOPLE our fair choice of internet browsers on our devices ...with NATIVE APP(OS manufacturers-own-apps just to be explicit) API access equitability

why doesn't this equate to any and all apps? full stop. If we wish to turn off absolutely any vendor supplied 'protections':
antivirus protections, boot protections, software run or software install protections, that ought be OUR CHOICE.......completely.

And same or similarly goes for software API access really (i think).
Certainly if there is any OS-vendor application or exposed feature shown to the user (i understand that some 'behind-the-scenes' functions or processes might have a need to utilise APIs that could or should remain private ..or rather not need to be publicised or documented at least.

EDITED (1 of)spelling error.

Edited 2012-07-19 13:27 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

mistersoft,

"why doesn't this equate to any and all apps? full stop."

I agree, it's very arbitrary to force ms to have competing browsers and give them a pass on your other examples. The harm cause to market competition applies equally well to other software.

My guess is that they are enforcing previous lawsuits and do not wish to broaden the scope even though the exact same principals are at stake with all software.

Reply Parent Score: 2